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USS Card file photo [31530]

Card

CountryUnited States
Ship ClassBogue-class Escort Carrier
Hull NumberCVE-11
BuilderSeattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding, Tacoma, Washington, United States
Laid Down27 Oct 1941
Launched21 Feb 1942
Commissioned8 Nov 1942
Decommissioned13 May 1946
Displacement8,520 tons standard; 14,200 tons full
Length465 feet
Beam70 feet
Draft23 feet
MachineryTwo Foster-Wheeler 285 psi boilers, one Allis-Chalmers steam turbine, one shaft
Power Output8,500 shaft horsepower
Speed18 knots
Crew890
Armament1942: 2x5in/51cal guns, 10x20mm Oerlikon anti-aircraft cannon; 1945: 2x5in/38cal guns, 8x2x40mm Bofors anti-aircraft guns, 20x20mm Oerlikon anti-aircraft cannon
Aircraft24
Elevator2
Catapult1

Contributor:

ww2dbaseIn 1941 in the United States, the Todd Shipyard in Tacoma, Washington was operated by the Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corporation. The shipyard had eight shipways and in late 1941 and early 1942, all eight were occupied with Maritime Commission Type C-3-class hulls under construction. Normally, this hull design was the basis for several manners of merchant ship but on 1 May 1942 all eight were acquired by the United States Navy for completion as auxiliary aircraft carriers. These would ultimately become Bogue-class escort carriers Bogue, Card, Nassau, Altamaha, Core, Barnes, Block Island, and the British lend-lease escort carrier HMS Tracker.

ww2dbaseOn 8 Nov 1942, what began as Maritime Commission Hull #178 was commissioned as Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Card at the Puget Sound Navy Yard in Bremerton, Washington, Captain James B. Sykes commanding. Card's initial designation as an Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier (ACV) implied she was more of a transport ship than a fighting ship. After some more fitting out at Puget Sound and some shakedown off San Diego, California, Card transited the Panama Canal on 26 Jan 1943 and arrived at Norfolk, Virginia on 1 Feb 1943. In a routine change of command, Captain Arnold Jay "Buster" Isbell relieved Captain Sykes as commanding officer.

ww2dbaseCard's first operational sortie in late May 1943 was an aircraft ferrying trip from New York to Casablanca in French Morocco. Card then made the return voyage to Norfolk arriving 5 Jun 1943. Ten days later, Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier Card (ACV-11) was reclassified as Escort Carrier Card (CVE-11). With the stroke of a pen, Card was a warship at last and she was made ready to lead an anti-submarine Hunter-Killer group.

ww2dbaseHunter-Killer groups became feasible with the convergence of several factors as the war progressed. One was the availability of enough small aircraft carriers, escort ships, and aircraft to outfit these groups; another was the development of specialized anti-submarine weaponry like the Mark 24 FIDO homing torpedo and the growing dependability of sonobuoys; and finally, the breaking of the German submarine enigma codes that allowed the Allies to reasonably predict U-Boat locations. Much of the enigma traffic related to when and where submarines would meet other submarines for replenishment, something that played perfectly to the hands of the Hunter-Killer groups. Hunter-Killer groups were formed in both the Atlantic and Pacific and in time, 14 United States escort carriers would lead them: USS Santee, Bogue, Card, Core, Block Island, Croatan, Anzio, Mission Bay, Guadalcanal, Tripoli, Wake Island, Solomons, Tulagi, and Hoggatt Bay.

ww2dbaseFor her first Hunter-Killer sortie, Card embarked the TBF-1 Avengers and F4F-4 Wildcats of Composite Squadron One (VC-1) and sailed into the Atlantic on 27 Jul 1943 as flagship of Task Group 21.14. One week after sailing, Card's aviators made their first attack when Lt(jg) "Zeke" Cormier flying an Avenger dropped two depth charges and one FIDO torpedo on a German submarine. Cormier reported that the submarine was sunk but this was never confirmed.

ww2dbaseCard's first confirmed submarine sinking came four days later on 7 Aug 1943 when Lt(jg) Asbury H. Sallenger in his Avenger, acting on enigma intercepts, caught submarines U-117 and U-66 on the surface exchanging provisions. Sallenger attacked immediately and crippled the larger U-177. In the following coordinated attack involving six Avengers and four Wildcats, U-117 was sunk with Mark 24 FIDO torpedoes and U-66 was likely damaged. For his part in this attack, Sallenger would be awarded the Navy Cross. It happened again the very next day when Sallenger interrupted a refueling rendezvous with three surfaced submarines, but this encounter did not go as well for the Card aviators. Sallenger was accompanied by Ensign John F. Sprague in a Wildcat who strafed the U-262 in the hopes the submarine would dive (according to the Hunter-Killer doctrine, a surfaced submarine would be attacked with gunfire and/or aerial depth charges to force it to submerge whereupon a FIDO homing torpedo would be launched that, by design, was not effective against a surfaced submarine but could seek out and destroy a shallowly submerged one). U-262 fought back against Sprague's attack, however, and Sprague was shot down and killed. Sallenger attacked with depth charges but U-262 gunners fired on him too, damaging the Avenger enough that Sallenger had to make a water landing. The depth charges, however, caused serious damage to U-262. The other two submarines at the rendezvous slipped away undamaged. For his efforts in this attack, Sallenger would be awarded the Silver Star.

ww2dbaseFortunes reversed again the next day when Card aircraft found U-664 on the surface and attacked. Bombs, depth charges, and machine gun fire crippled the submarine and she began to sink by the stern. Many of the crew abandoned the vessel into the water before the submarine sank altogether. Card's escorts mounted no rescue efforts right away because of the proximity of other submarines but seven hours after the initial attack, once darkness fell, USS Borie began picking up U-664 survivors. Forty-four survivors were picked up but as Borie was doing so, her lookouts reported no fewer than five different torpedo wakes passing the ship close aboard. The U-664 sailors were transferred to the Card the following day.

ww2dbaseTwo days later, Card aircraft launched depth charges and one FIDO torpedo against submarine U-525 which sank with all hands. Five days after that, Card and her task group arrived at Casablanca in French Morocco to put the 44 German prisoners ashore and for five days of rest and replenishment. Once back at sea, two different flights of Card aircraft found two different surfaced German submarines on the same day. U-508 was damaged but escaped and U-847 was sunk with all 62 hands. After one more sweep of their patrol area, Card put into Norfolk.

ww2dbaseAfter a two-week refit, Card put to sea again on 23 Sep 1943 but with a different air contingent. For this voyage, Composite Squadron Nine (VC-9) came aboard. VC-9 had just finished distinguishing themselves on their previous Hunter-Killer cruise aboard USS Bogue where they had destroyed four submarines and damaged three others. After a few days of anti-submarine exercises around Bermuda, Card and her group returned to the Central Atlantic. Within a week, Card aircraft found four surfaced German submarines 440 miles north of the Azores in the midst of refueling. U-422 was sunk immediately while a longer search and pursuit ended with the destruction of the U-460 tanker submarine or "Milchkau" (Milk Cow). U-264 and U-455 got away but not before U-264 was damaged.

ww2dbaseEight days later on 12 Oct 1943, Lt(jg) Letson "Sam" Balliett in a TBF Avenger interrupted another refueling operation involving Milchkau U-488 and U-402. Balliett attacked but both escaped with only minimal or no damage. Later that same day in different attack, U-731 was damaged. U-402's escape from Lt(jg) Balliett did not last long, however, as she was found again the following day and sunk with a FIDO torpedo. Card spent another week sweeping her assigned area before she and her group made a two-day stop at Casablanca.

ww2dbaseTen days after leaving Morocco on 30 Oct 1943, a Card pilot reported he had attacked and sunk a surfaced submarine but there never confirmed. The next day, U-584 and U-91 were spotted at a rendezvous point. Both were attacked and U-584 was sunk with all hands while U-91 escaped unharmed. Later that night while pursuing the escaping U-91, escort destroyer USS Borie attacked and damaged U-256. A few hours later, Borie shelled, depth charged, and then rammed U-405. U-405 sank with all hands but Borie was so badly damaged that she could not even be towed. Borie was abandoned and her crew was taken aboard destroyers USS Barry and Goff before Borie was to be scuttled by gunfire and torpedoes. Stubbornly, the ship would not sink and the scuttling was finally accomplished in the very unusual manner of being bombed from the air by one of Card's Avengers. All of Borie's crew successfully left the ship but 27 were lost to the icy waters, many simply too weak to come over the sides of the rescuing destroyers. The remaining 130 survivors were transferred to Card as the task group retired toward Norfolk.

ww2dbaseOn 10 Nov 1943, the day after arriving at Norfolk, Card received an impressive delegation of dignitaries including seven flag officers:

ww2dbaseIn a mere 40 minutes aboard the ship, Admiral Ingersoll made several award presentations:

ww2dbaseAdditionally, Borie's Engineering Officer, Lieutenant Morrison Brown, received the Navy Cross posthumously.

ww2dbaseFollowing a two-week refit, Card's task group was reformed with a different set of escort ships and with Composite Squadron 55 embarked. The task group sailed 24 Nov 1943, patrolled the Central Atlantic for three weeks without engaging a submarine, spent three days in Casablanca, and resumed their patrols for a week before running into the notorious North Atlantic bad weather. During the night of 23 Dec 1943, Card was trying to cover the flank of the southbound Britain-to-Gibraltar Convoy OS-62/KMS-36 of fifty ships in weather so bad the task group had to run with the wind with no possibility of launching aircraft. In these miserable conditions, Card's group steamed directly through the thirteen German submarines of Wolfpack Borkum. Card and destroyer USS Decatur were attacked unsuccessfully by U-415. Destroyer USS Schenck attacked U-645 and probably damaged it. After Card's group scattered Wolfpack Borkum, U-415 attacked convoy escort HMS Hurricane using Germany's acoustic homing torpedo, codenamed GNAT. U-415's GNAT found its mark and blew Hurricane's stern off, killing three and wounding nine. Hurricane, unable to move, was scuttled the following morning by the destroyer HMS Watchman.

ww2dbaseMeanwhile, Card and her screen continued the running battle with the German wolfpack. Destroyer USS Schenck sank German submarine U-645 while U-275 torpedoed and sank destroyer USS Leary, also with a GNAT. Ninety-seven of Leary's crew were killed and 59 were picked up by Schenk.

ww2dbaseCard and her group arrived at Norfolk on 2 Jan 1944, lucky to have made it through their trip through the lion's den as well as they did. Three weeks later, Card's group reformed, again with Composite Squadron 55 embarked but with a new slate of escort ships and more of them; Card's screen was increased from three to five.

ww2dbaseOn 30 Jan 1944 in the mid-Atlantic, Card and her group encountered a mysterious surface ship that they were nearly forced to fire upon. Aircraft first observed a large armed merchant ship traveling alone that would not respond to normal challenges to identify herself. Card had already observed German blockade runners traveling disguised and unescorted and so Captain Isbell was naturally suspicious. Blinker signals and radio messages failed to get any proper response. Even Card's blunt message, "United States Navy orders you to steer course 180" brought only confusing flag hoists, nonsensical blinker signals, and erratic 90-degree turns. This went on most of the day until finally one of Card's planes was ordered to drop two bombs off the ship's bow. Only then did the ship heave to and respond correctly to all challenges from one of Card's escorts. She identified herself as the Canadian merchant cruiser HMCS Prince Henry. The communications difficulty, they said, was due to the poor weather and rough seas, but Captain Isbell wasn't sure he was buying it.

ww2dbaseCard and her group then turned south, venturing nearly down into the tropical zone. On 12 Feb 1944, Card received a secret dispatch to proceed to a reported rendezvous between a northbound Japanese submarine and a German submarine after dark the following day. This message was clearly the product of Allied codebreaking at the highest levels and while Card had no idea about the details at the time, this was to be the meeting of Japanese I-29 with German U-518. Seventeen months before, I-29 had been the submarine that, with one spread of Type 95 torpedoes, sank or severely crippled three American warships southeast of Guadalcanal (aircraft carrier Wasp, sunk; battleship North Carolina, badly damaged; and destroyer O'Brien, badly damaged and later sank). In 1944, however, I-29 was traveling from Japan to Germany on the Fourth Yanagi mission to exchange technologies between the two countries using submarine transports. I-29 was loaded with a cargo of rubber, tin, tungsten, zinc, quinine, opium, and coffee. I-29 was to rendezvous with the German U-518 to take aboard three German technicians and two types of radar detectors. That meeting took place on schedule but 650 miles west of where Card was told to look. Card was told to proceed to 28-degrees North Latitude and 29-degrees West Longitude but the actual rendezvous was at 28-degrees North Latitude and 39-degrees West Longitude, a difference of 10 degrees of longitude. It is unknown where this simple error, almost a clerical error, entered the intelligence stream but for this simple difference, Card might have been right on top of this meeting. As it was, Card diligently searched her area but (naturally) found no Japanese submarine. I-29 would successfully arrive in Lorient, France, her captain would be personally decorated by Adolf Hitler for sinking the Wasp, and then I-29 would depart on her return to Japan with her cargo of an advanced German rocket motor. Codebreaking intercepts caught up with her again, however (Japanese codes this time), and I-29 was sunk in the Luzon Strait on 26 Jul 1944 by three torpedoes (that worked!) from submarine USS Sawfish.

ww2dbaseOnce USS Card exhausted her search efforts in the wrong place, she and her group retired to Casablanca and then to Norfolk. As soon as she arrived in Norfolk, there was a routine change of command where Captain Rufus Young, Jr. relieved Captain Isbell. A break from Hunter-Killer missions followed. Card shifted to New York and loaded Army fighter planes and personnel for transportation to Africa. After a quick turnaround in Casablanca, Card returned to New York for another load of planes and people. On 23 Apr 1944, Card departed New York for Casablanca once again but this time in company with fleet carrier USS Ranger which was also ferrying planes and personnel. Following another quick return, Card was attached to the fleet aviation training center at Quonset Point, Rhode Island on Narragansett Bay.

ww2dbaseAs D-Day was raging in Normandy, Card was beginning two weeks of carrier qualifications where pilots from several squadrons were certified in their ability to land airplanes on flight decks. Back in Norfolk later that month, Card embarked Composite Squadron 12 in preparation for another Hunter-Killer sortie. As flagship of Task Group 22.10, Card and her group departed Norfolk on 25 Jun 1944. The group conducted anti-submarine exercises off Bermuda for two days that included tracking the friendly Italian submarine RIN Goffredo Mameli.

ww2dbaseCard and her group then took their station southeast of Newfoundland where they were plagued by several days of persistent heavy fog. Even so, there were hints of a submarine working those waters and Card's group spent several days stalking it. During the evening of 5 Jul 1944, destroyer escort USS Baker steaming 20,000 yards off Card's port beam developed a sound contact and attacked. After three well-placed depth charge patterns, submarine U-233 came to the surface. Baker opened fire with her guns and fired two torpedoes. Destroyer escort USS Thomas came to assist, also firing her guns and then Thomas rammed the submarine. The U-Boat's bow rose at a high angle and the submarine began sinking quickly by the stern. Baker, Thomas, and USS Breeman recovered thirty U-233 survivors from the water and delivered them to the Card. This included U-233's badly wounded commanding officer Kapitänleutnant Hans Steen who died of his wounds the next day and was buried at sea with full military honors.

ww2dbaseCard and her group began retiring toward Boston, arriving 7 Jul 1944. After ramming U-233, USS Thomas remained in Boston to tend to her repairs and was replaced by USS Coffman as the task group departed on 10 Jul 1944, this time bound for the Caribbean. Almost right away after her arrival south of Puerto Rico, Card developed engine trouble that sent her planes to shore bases while Card limped into San Juan for repairs. Once Card rejoined her task group, the ships responded to intelligence intercepts describing a German submarine leaving the Caribbean. Card followed the submarine's path which took the group back into the central Atlantic. Card's airmen had a few hopeful moments but no confirmed contacts before returning to Norfolk on 23 Aug 1944.

ww2dbaseAlmost a month later, Card formed a new Hunter-Killer task group and returned to the mid-Atlantic for eight weeks but engaged no submarines. The most noteworthy event was a large wave that came over Card's fantail and flooded several compartments. One sailor was injured and the water was pumped out with no damage to the ship. This cruise was followed by another month-long Hunter-Killer sortie without results that ended with Card back at Quonset Point for two weeks of carrier qualifications before going into the Philadelphia Navy Yard for an overhaul. After that, Card was back on aircraft ferry duty when she took Army fighter planes and Army and Navy personnel from New York to Liverpool, England, returning to Norfolk on 12 Mar 1945.

ww2dbaseAt Norfolk, Captain Paul L. Dudley relieved Captain Young as Card's commanding officer. Card then resumed carrier qualifications at Quonset Point where she remained for nine weeks. During that period, Card landed 4,742 planes with only one fatal accident. Back to ferrying duty, Card transported personnel of Utility Squadron VJ-5, their 25 TD2C-1 utility/drone aircraft, and all of the squadron's peripheral equipment from Norfolk to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. From there, Card sailed empty to the Panama Canal and into the Pacific. She made multiple trips transporting men and equipment from the west coast to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii and as far west as Guam. On the day Japan surrendered, Card was entering San Diego harbor in California. Card made two voyages as part of Operation Magic Carpet bringing American servicemen back to the United States from assignments in Hawaii and the western Pacific. Her last Magic Carpet voyage ended in Alameda, California and from there, Card steamed back to Norfolk where she was placed out of commission on 13 May 1946 and put in the Reserve Fleet.

ww2dbaseWithout being recommissioned, Card went through a series of reclassifications until 16 May 1958 when she was reactivated as the aircraft transport USNS Card with a civilian crew operating under the Military Sea Transportation Service contracted to the Navy. Card transported servicemen and aircraft, mainly helicopters, to Vietnam.

ww2dbaseOn 2 May 1964, as Card was dockside at Saigon, South Vietnam (now Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam), a Viet Cong swimmer named Lam Son Nao placed an explosive charge against Card's hull that blew a hole in the ship and killed five crewmen. Card settled on the bottom in 20 feet of water. She was patched, pumped out, and raised on 19 May 1964 before being towed to Subic Bay, Philippines and then Yokosuka, Japan for repairs. Card returned to service on 11 Dec 1964.

ww2dbaseCard entered the Reserve Fleet once again on 10 Mar 1970, this time at Olympia, Washington. The ship was sold for scrap on 14 May 1971 and withdrawn from the fleet.

ww2dbaseDuring World War II, Card's aircraft destroyed a total of eight enemy submarines and her escorts accounted for another three. In addition to her Presidential Unit Citation, Card received three battle stars for service in World War II: two in the European Theater, where far fewer battle stars were authorized than in the Pacific, and one in the American Theater, where extremely few stars were authorized at all. In fact, all three of these stars were limited to the three individual sorties of Card's Task Group 21.14 between 27 Jul 1943 and 2 Jan 1944.

ww2dbaseSources:
United States Navy
UBoat.net
The Museum of Flight Oral History Collection - Zeke Cormier
NavSource Naval History
Todd Pacific Shipyards, Inc.
Port of Tacoma
Japanese Naval History (combinedfleet.com)
Military Times Hall of Valor
Royal Naval Warships Service Histories (Naval-History.net)
Bob Bryant
History.net
Wikipedia

Last Major Revision: Nov 2021

Escort Carrier Card (CVE-11) Interactive Map

Card Operational Timeline

27 Oct 1941 Maritime Commission Type C-3-class Hull #178 was laid down at the Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corporation’s Tacoma shipyard. The hull would later be repurposed as the Card, an auxiliary aircraft carrier for the United States Navy.
21 Feb 1942 Maritime Commission Type C-3-class Hull #178 was launched at the Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corporation’s Tacoma shipyard with Mrs. J. Perry acting as sponsor. The hull would later be repurposed as the Card, an auxiliary aircraft carrier for the United States Navy.
1 May 1942 As Maritime Commission Type C-3-class Hull #178 was being fitted out at the Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corporation’s Tacoma shipyard, it was acquired by the United States Navy for the purpose of making it into the auxiliary aircraft carrier Card. Her final fitting out as a Bogue-class escort carrier was completed at the Puget Sound Navy Yard.
8 Nov 1942 Bogue-class escort carrier USS Card was placed in commission at the Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington with Captain James B. Sykes in command. Card was commissioned as an Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier (ACV).
15 Nov 1942 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Card entered Drydock #1 at Puget Sound Navy Yard for five days as part of her final fitting out
2 Dec 1942 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Card departed Puget Sound, Washington bound for San Diego, California.
6 Dec 1942 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Card arrived at North Island, San Diego, California, United States.
21 Dec 1942 After two weeks of maneuvers and shakedown, escort carrier USS Card departed San Diego, California bound for Puget Sound, Washington.
24 Dec 1942 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Card arrived at Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington.
13 Jan 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Card departed Puget Sound, Washington bound for San Diego, California.
17 Jan 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Card arrived at North Island, San Diego, California, United States for an eight hour refueling stop and to embark Composite Squadron VC-1. Card then got underway again, bound for the Panama Canal.
26 Jan 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Card transited the Panama Canal from the Pacific to the Atlantic.
1 Feb 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Card arrived at Norfolk, Virginia, anchoring in Hampton Roads.
4 Feb 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Card departed Norfolk, Virginia bound for New York, New York.
5 Feb 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Card arrived in New York Harbor, anchoring in Gravesend Bay, Brooklyn.
7 Feb 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Card shifted berths from Gravesend Bay to the Brooklyn Navy Yard.
4 Mar 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Card departed New York bound for Norfolk, Virginia.
5 Mar 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Card arrived at Norfolk Operating Base, Norfolk, Virginia.
17 Apr 1943 In a routine change of command, Captain Arnold Jay "Buster" Isbell relieved Captain James Sykes as commanding officer of USS Card while the ship was at anchor in Hampton Roads, Virginia.
11 May 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Card departed Norfolk, Virginia bound for New York, New York.
12 May 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Card arrived in New York Harbor, anchoring off Tompkinsville, Staten Island, New York.
14 May 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Card departed New York bound for Casablanca, Morocco ferrying aircraft and troops.
1 Jun 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Card arrived in Casablanca Harbor, Casablanca, French Morocco.
9 Jun 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Card departed Casablanca, French Morocco bound for Norfolk, Virginia.
5 Jul 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Card arrived at Norfolk Operating Base, Norfolk, Virginia.
15 Jul 1943 Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier USS Card (ACV-11) was reclassified as Escort Carrier USS Card (CVE-11).
26 Jul 1943 While underway in Chesapeake Bay for the day, escort carrier USS Card landed TBF-1 Avengers and F4F-4Wildcats of Composite Squadron VC-1.
27 Jul 1943 Task Group 21.14 (TG 21.14) was formed at Norfolk, Virginia as an anti-submarine Hunter-Killer group centered around escort carrier USS Card with the TBF Avengers and F4F Wildcats of Composite Squadron VC-1 embarked and with escorts of Clemson-class destroyers USS Barry, Goff, and Borie. TG 21.14 departed Norfolk bound for the Central Atlantic that same day.
29 Jul 1943 Hunter-Killer Task Group 21.14 centered around escort carrier USS Card and escorts arrived in Bermuda.
30 Jul 1943 Task Group 21.14 centered around escort carrier USS Card departed Naval Operating Base Bermuda on their first combat sortie.
3 Aug 1943 US Navy Lt(jg) Zeke Cormier flying a TBF Avenger from escort carrier USS Card dropped two depth charges and one Mark 24 FIDO on what was believed to be a German submarine in the mid-Atlantic. One submarine was reported sunk but this was never confirmed.
7 Aug 1943 In a coordinated attack by six TBF-1 Avenger torpedo bombers and four F4F-4 Wildcat fighters with Composite Squadron VC-1 flying from USS Card, German supply submarine U-117 was sunk with Mark 24 FIDO acoustic homing torpedoes. U-117 had been supplying U-66 in the mid-Atlantic when both were caught on the surface by Lt(jg) A.H. Sallenger in his Avenger. U-117 was sunk and U-66 was likely damaged.
8 Aug 1943 In poor weather with heavy swell south of Greenland, German submarine U-262 (Kapitänleutnant Rudolf Heinz Franke) was awaiting refueling from U-664 whilst U-760 was being supplied. At 1010 hours, a TBF Avenger aircraft and F4F Wildcat aircraft from escort carrier USS Card located the submarines and attacked. The Wildcat strafed the decks of U-262 while the Avenger approached with depth charges. The gunners aboard U-262 hit both attackers. The Wildcat crashed, killing Ensign John F. Sprague. The Avenger’s bomb bay was hit, jamming the release mechanism. The Avenger pilot, Lt(jg) Asbury H. Sallenger pulled away, and was hit again in the starboard wing. The crew manually released two depth charges (damaging U-262 with a near-miss) and jettisoned a Mark 24 FIDO torpedo, and Sallenger made a water landing. Sallenger and the gunner survived, but the radio operator went down with the aircraft. The two survivors were spotted by another aircraft from USS Card and were picked up by destroyer USS Barry in the afternoon. TBF Avenger pilots Lt(jg) C.R. Stapler and Lt(jg) “Zeke” Cormier dropped additional Mark 24 FIDO torpedoes on a moving oil slick that was likely from the damaged U-262, but results were unobserved. U-262, though damaged, made her way back to base. In a separate attack, companion German submarine U-664 launched three torpedoes at USS Card under the cover of darkness. There were no explosions and USS Card reports make no mention of this, indicating Card was unaware of the attack. Planes from Card would sink U-664 the next day.
9 Aug 1943 TBF-1 Avengers and F4F-4 Wildcats from escort carrier USS Card attacked German submarine U-664 in the mid-Atlantic using 500-pound bombs, depth charges, and machine gun fire. The submarine was crippled and began to sink. Seven or eight of her crew were killed (sources differ) and 44 abandon ship. Once darkness fell, seven hours after the attack, one of Card’s escorts, destroyer USS Borie, picked up all 44 survivors. During the recovery operation, Borie’s log reported five different torpedo wakes passing close aboard the ship. The U-664 survivors would be transferred to USS Card the following day.
11 Aug 1943 TBF-1 Avenger aircraft and F4F-4 Wildcats flying from USS Card in the mid-Atlantic attacked the surfaced German submarine U-525 using two depth charges and one Mark 24 FIDO acoustic homing torpedo. U-525 was lost with all 54 hands.
16 Aug 1943 Escort carrier USS Card and her task group arrived at Casablanca, French Morocco. Card disembarked the 44 German prisoners of the sunken U-664.
21 Aug 1943 Escort carrier USS Card and her task group departed Casablanca and resumed their anti-submarine patrols in the mid-Atlantic.
27 Aug 1943 TBF-1 Avenger aircraft flying from USS Card in the mid-Atlantic launched two separate attacks on two separate German submarines using Mark 24 FIDO acoustic homing torpedoes. U-508 was damaged but escaped and U-847 was sunk with all 62 hands.
10 Sep 1943 Escort carrier USS Card and her task group arrived at Norfolk, Virginia at the conclusion of their Atlantic anti-submarine voyage. Composite Squadron VC-1 disembarked Card and transferred to Norfolk Naval Air Station. Squadron VC-1, all ships of the task group, and all men therein were authorized to wear Battle Star A204 on their American Campaign Ribbon.
23 Sep 1943 Task Group 21.14 (TG 21.14) was reformed at Norfolk, Virginia as an anti-submarine Hunter-Killer group centered around escort carrier USS Card with the TBF Avengers and F4F Wildcats of Composite Squadron VC-9 embarked and with escorts of Clemson-class destroyers USS Barry, Goff, and Borie. TG 21.14 departed Norfolk bound for the Central Atlantic that same day.
27 Sep 1943 Hunter-Killer Task Group 21.14 centered around escort carrier USS Card and escorts arrived in Bermuda.
28 Sep 1943 Task Group 21.14 centered around escort carrier USS Card departed Naval Operating Base Bermuda on their second anti-submarine Hunter-Killer combat sortie.
4 Oct 1943 A TBF Avenger patrol aircraft with Composite Squadron VC-9 from Hunter-Killer escort carrier USS Card discovered German submarines U-264, U-422, and U-455 refueling from “Milchkau” U-460 on the surface of the Atlantic 440 miles north of the Azores. Attacking with aerial depth charges and one Mark 24 FIDO acoustic homing torpedo, U-422 was sunk immediately while the other three submarines submerged. As more aircraft and escort ships arrived in the area, a hunt for the other submarines ensued resulting in U-460 being sunk by aerial depth charges about seven miles away. U-264 and U-455 got away but U-264 was damaged. By breaking up this gathering of submarines, Convoy UGS-19 and its 102 merchant ships was able to safely pass through this area and complete its crossing from the United States to North Africa.
12 Oct 1943 Lt(jg) Letson “Sam” Balliett piloting a TBF Avenger flying from USS Card attacked a refueling operation between German submarines U-488 (“Milchkau”) and U-402 in the mid-Atlantic using one Mark 24 FIDO acoustic homing torpedo. Although this attack claimed one sinking, both submarines escaped with only minimal or no damage. Later, another TBF Avenger from Card flown by Lt(jg) Doty attacked and damaged U-731.
13 Oct 1943 TBF Avengers flying from USS Card attacked and sank German Type VIIC submarine U-402 in the mid-Atlantic using the Mark 24 FIDO acoustic homing torpedo.
18 Oct 1943 Escort carrier USS Card and her task group arrived at Casablanca, French Morocco.
20 Oct 1943 Escort carrier USS Card and her task group departed Casablanca and resumed their anti-submarine patrols in the mid-Atlantic.
30 Oct 1943 TBF-1 Avenger from escort carrier USS Card flown by Lt(jg) Fryatt sighted a German submarine on the surface in the mid-Atlantic. He reported that he “attacked as submarine submerged and sank it.” No German submarine was lost on this date in this area and there is no report of a similar attack (but within two days, two different U-Boats were lost almost on this spot so the attack could have been against one of these who had no chance to file a report about it).
31 Oct 1943 TBF-1 Avenger aircraft flying from USS Card in the mid-Atlantic flown by Lt(jg) W.S. Fowler and Lt(jg) Letson “Sam” Balliett launched a coordinated attack on German submarine U-584 using Mark 24 FIDO acoustic homing torpedoes. U-584 was lost with all 53 hands. U-91 was also attacked at the same rendezvous point but escaped unharmed.
1 Nov 1943 After aircraft from USS Card broke up a rendezvous of German submarines in the mid-Atlantic the day before and sank two, Card detached one of her escorts, USS Borie, to hunt for the remaining submarine(s) by night. Borie reported attacking and sinking one submarine shortly after midnight but U-256 is only damaged. Then just before dawn, Borie shelled, depth charged, and rammed submarine U-405. U-405 sank with all 49 hands.
2 Nov 1943 USS Card escort USS Borie suffered 27 dead in the ramming of U-256 the day before and was damaged so badly that she could not be towed. Borie was scuttled by gunfire and torpedoes from USS Barry as well as three aerial bombs from a TBF Avenger from Card.
5 Nov 1943 USS Card received aboard 130 survivors of USS Borie transferred over from USS Barry and USS Goff.
9 Nov 1943 Escort carrier USS Card and her remaining task group arrived at Norfolk, Virginia at the conclusion of their Atlantic anti-submarine voyage. Composite Squadron VC-9 disembarked Card and transferred to Norfolk Naval Air Station.
10 Nov 1943 The day after arriving at Norfolk, Virginia, escort carrier USS Card received a delegation of dignitaries including seven flag officers: Admiral Royal Ingersoll (Commander in Chief Atlantic Fleet), Vice Admiral Patrick Bellinger (Commander for Air, Atlantic Fleet), Vice Admiral Alexander Sharp (Commander of Service Forces, Atlantic Fleet), Rear Admiral Walter Kilpatrick (Chief of Staff to Commander Atlantic Fleet), Rear Admiral David LeBretan (Commandant 5th Naval District), Rear Admiral Gerald Bogan (Commander Fleet Air, Norfolk), and Rear Admiral Calvin Durgin (Commander Fleet Air, Quonset). In a mere 40 minutes aboard the ship, the following award presentations were made: Captain Arnold Isbell (Commanding Officer USS Card and Commander Task Group 21.14) received the Navy Distinguished Service Medal; Lieutenant Commanders Herbert Hill (Commanding Officer USS Barry), Hinton Smith (Commanding Officer USS Goff), and Howard Avery (Commanding Officer Composite Squadron VC-9) received the Legion of Merit; Lieutenant Charles Hutchins (Commanding Officer USS Borie) received the Navy Cross; and a Presidential Unit Citation was awarded to USS Card, USS Barry, USS Borie, USS Goff, Composite Squadron VC-1, Composite Squadron VC-9, and all men who served in these elements during the Task Group 21.14 operations. LtCdr Avery would also receive the Navy Cross and the Distinguished Flying Cross for later actions while commanding VC-9 from USS Card. Further, Squadron VC-9, all ships of the task group, and all men therein during this sortie were authorized to wear Battle Star E211 on their European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Ribbon.
24 Nov 1943 Task Group 21.14 (TG 21.14) was reformed at Norfolk, Virginia as an anti-submarine Hunter-Killer group centered around escort carrier USS Card with the TBF-1C Avengers and FM-1 Wildcats of Composite Squadron VC-55 embarked and with escorts of destroyers USS Decatur, Leary, Babbitt, Schenk. TG 21.14 departed Norfolk bound for the Central Atlantic that same day.
15 Dec 1943 Escort carrier USS Card and her task group arrived at Casablanca, French Morocco.
18 Dec 1943 Escort carrier USS Card and her task group departed Casablanca and resumed their anti-submarine patrols in the mid-Atlantic.
23 Dec 1943 During North Atlantic weather so bad that escort carrier USS Card and her escorts had to run with the wind and Card could launch no aircraft for anti-submarine patrols, the group steamed directly through German submarine wolfpack Borkum. Card and screening destroyer USS Decatur were attacked unsuccessfully by U-415. Screening destroyer USS Schenck attacked and probably damaged U-645.
24 Dec 1943 While escort carrier USS Card and her escorts were shadowing an Allied convoy bound for Gibraltar from Liverpool through bad weather, one of the convoy’s escorts, destroyer HMS Hurricane, was struck by a German GNAT acoustic homing torpedo launched from submarine U-415. 30-feet of Hurricane’s stern was blown off and the ship was scuttled by torpedo the following day. Three were killed and nine were wounded. Card and her screen continued to battle the wolfpack of German U-boats. Destroyer USS Schenck sank German submarine U-645. USS Leary was torpedoed and sunk by U-275, also with a GNAT. 97 of Leary’s crew were killed and 59 were picked up by Schenk.
2 Jan 1944 Escort carrier USS Card and her remaining task group arrived at Norfolk, Virginia at the conclusion of their Atlantic anti-submarine voyage. Composite Squadron VC-55 disembarked Card and transferred to Norfolk Naval Air Station. Task Group 21.14 was dissolved. Squadron VC-55, all ships of the task group, and all men therein during this sortie were authorized to wear Battle Star E214 on their European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Ribbon.
24 Jan 1944 Task Group 21.14 (TG 21.14) was reformed at Norfolk, Virginia as an anti-submarine Hunter-Killer group centered around escort carrier USS Card with the TBF-1C Avengers and FM-2 Wildcats of Composite Squadron VC-55 embarked and with escorts of destroyers USS Livermore, Jacob Jones, and Hammann and destroyer escorts USS Robert E. Peary and Blair. TG 21.14 departed Norfolk bound for the Central Atlantic that same day.
30 Jan 1944 In the mid-Atlantic, planes and escorts from escort carrier USS Card encountered an unidentified ship refusing all challenges and making erratic course changes. After numerous challenges and even firing on the ship by means of an aircraft dropping two bombs off the ship’s bow with no acknowledgement, escorting destroyer USS Livermore came close aboard and made direct contact. Only then did the ship respond correctly to all challenges and identify herself as the Canadian merchant cruiser HMCS Prince Henry. The communications difficulty was attributed to poor weather and rough seas.
13 Feb 1944 Acting on intelligence intercepts, the Hunter-Killer group centered around escort carrier USS Card concentrated their search efforts to an area in the mid-Atlantic 750 miles west of the Canary Islands where a northbound Japanese submarine was supposed to be meeting with two German submarines. With day and night extended air searches, as well as searches by the surface ships, fresh oil slicks were noted but no submarines were located.
20 Feb 1944 Escort carrier USS Card and her task group arrived at Casablanca, French Morocco.
21 Feb 1944 While escort carrier USS Card was moored at Casablanca, French Morocco during moderate winds, fleet oiler USS Chicopee fouled Card’s anchor chain when shifting berths. Chicopee then backed into Card’s number two sponson causing minor damage to Card but rendering Chicopee’s 5-inch gun inoperative. Card’s stern mooring lines and fresh water connection were also carried away. With assistance from harbor tugs, Card regained her moorings to the jetty.
23 Feb 1944 As gusty winds continued in the harbor at Casablanca, French Morocco, escort carrier USS Card broke loose from her moorings again and began swinging in her berth. Card’s flight deck smashed against the bridge of British freighter Shirrbank causing minor damage to both. Card shifted to the outer harbor where her anchor was carried away leaving her adrift. Card then got underway to the open sea on her assignment one day earlier than anticipated. Card sailed with her task group, that included USS Trippe in place of USS Livermore.
9 Mar 1944 Escort carrier USS Card and her task group arrived at Norfolk, Virginia and Task Group TG21.12 was dissolved. Composite Squadron VC-55 disembarked to Norfolk Naval Air Station. The day she arrived, USS Card had a routine change of command with Captain Rufus Young, Jr. relieving Captain Arnold Isbell.
18 Mar 1944 After a nine-day maintenance period at Norfolk, Virginia, escort carrier USS Card departed Norfolk bound for New York.
19 Mar 1944 Escort carrier USS Card arrived at Staten Island Army Base, New York.
23 Mar 1944 Loaded with 204 US Army personnel as passengers, 12 P-47 Thunderbolts, and 50 P-51 Mustangs, escort carrier USS Card departed Staten Island Army Base, New York bound for Casablanca, French Morocco.
2 Apr 1944 Escort carrier USS Card arrived at Casablanca, French Morocco with her load of Army aircraft and personnel.
5 Apr 1944 Loaded with 61 US Army personnel as passengers and 11 P-38 Lightning aircraft, escort carrier USS Card departed Casablanca, French Morocco bound for New York.
14 Apr 1944 Escort carrier USS Card arrived at Staten Island Army Base, New York.
23 Apr 1944 With fleet carrier USS Ranger loaded with 76 US Army P-38 Lightning aircraft and escort carrier USS Card loaded with 100 US Army P-51 Mustang fighters and 204 US Army personnel, both ships, along with their escorts, departed New York bound for Casablanca in French Morocco.
4 May 1944 Fleet carrier USS Ranger and escort carrier USS Card arrived at Casablanca in French Morocco.
7 May 1944 Fleet carrier USS Ranger and escort carrier USS Card departed Casablanca in French Morocco bound for New York.
16 May 1944 Detached from the USS Ranger group while at sea and diverted to Norfolk, Virginia with engine difficulties, escort carrier USS Card arrived at Norfolk and began a period of maintenance and upkeep.
4 Jun 1944 Escort carrier USS Card departed Norfolk bound for Quonset Point, Rhode Island.
5 Jun 1944 Escort carrier USS Card arrived at Quonset Point, Rhode Island where she began two weeks of carrier qualifications involving various air groups.
24 Jun 1944 Composite Squadron VC-12 reported aboard escort carrier USS Card at Norfolk, Virginia with their compliment of TBF Avengers and FM-2 Wildcat aircraft.
25 Jun 1944 Task Group 22.10 (TG 22.10) was formed at Norfolk, Virginia as an anti-submarine Hunter-Killer group centered around escort carrier USS Card with the TBM-1C Avengers and FM-2 Wildcats of Composite Squadron VC-12 embarked and screened by destroyer escorts USS Baker, Bronstein, Thomas, Breeman, and Bostwick. TG 22.10 departed Norfolk bound for the Central Atlantic that same day.
27 Jun 1944 After exercises and work-ups around Bermuda that included exercising with the friendly Italian submarine RIN Goffredo Mameli, USS Card and her escorts steamed north toward their operating area southeast of Newfoundland.
5 Jul 1944 After several days on station southeast of Newfoundland without being able to launch aircraft due to persistent fog, escort carrier USS Card and her escorts engaged the submerged German submarine U-233. Destroyer escorts USS Baker and Thomas attacked with depth charges that forced U-233 to the surface. As the crew began abandoning ship, U-233 started her diesels and began making her way out of the engagement. Thomas rammed the U-Boat just abaft the conning tower and U-233 sank quickly by the stern. 30 were rescued from the water and 31 were lost. The USS Card Task Group then began a withdrawal toward Boston.
6 Jul 1944 After the escort carrier USS Card’s task group engaged and sank German submarine U-233, escort ships USS Baker and Thomas transferred 30 German prisoners to Card, including U-233’s badly wounded commanding officer Kapitänleutnant Hans Steen. Kapitänleutnant Steen later died of his wounds and was buried at sea with full military honors.
7 Jul 1944 Anti-submarine Hunter-Killer Task Group 22.10 centered around escort carrier USS Card arrived at Boston, Massachusetts.
10 Jul 1944 Anti-submarine Hunter-Killer Task Group 22.10 (TG 22.10) centered around escort carrier USS Card, still with the TBM-1C Avengers and FM-2 Wildcats of Composite Squadron VC-12 embarked, departed Boston bound for the Caribbean. Destroyer escorts USS Baker, Bronstein, Breeman, and Bostwick remained but USS Coffman replaced the damaged USS Thomas.
14 Jul 1944 Escort carrier USS Card and her task group transited the Mona Passage between Puerto Rico and the island of Hispaniola and entered the Caribbean Sea.
16 Jul 1944 Just as anti-submarine aircraft from escort carrier USS Card developed a submerged target southwest of Mona Island by means of sonobuoys, the main bearings of the carrier’s single turbine burned out leaving the ship dead in the water. The aircraft launched two Mark 24 FIDO homing torpedoes without result. Contact was lost and the airborne aircraft were diverted to Borinquen Field, Puerto Rico.
18 Jul 1944 Escort carrier USS Card arrived at San Juan, Puerto Rico for repairs to the main bearings of her single turbine.
28 Jul 1944 Escort carrier USS Card departed San Juan, Puerto Rico after repairs to her engines. Acting on intelligence intercepts, Card and her task unit began pursuing a German submarine reported leaving the Caribbean to cross the Atlantic.
31 Jul 1944 TBM Avengers from escort carrier USS Card dropped sonobuoys on an oil slick in the mid-Atlantic and detected propeller cavitation noises. Two Mark 24 FIDO homing torpedoes were dropped with one confirmed underwater explosion. No confirmation of a submarine was obtained.
6 Aug 1944 TBM Avengers from escort carrier USS Card detected submarine noises from sonobuoys in the mid-Atlantic and launched two Mark 24 FIDO homing torpedoes with one confirmed underwater explosion. No confirmation of a submarine was obtained.
23 Aug 1944 Escort carrier USS Card detached her escorts to proceed to New York and disembarked Composite Squadron VC-12 to fly to Norfolk Naval Air Station. Card arrived at Norfolk Naval Operating base, Norfolk, Virginia.
18 Sep 1944 Task Group 22.2 (TG 22.2) was formed at Norfolk, Virginia as an anti-submarine Hunter-Killer group centered around escort carrier USS Card with the TBM Avengers and FM-2 Wildcats of Composite Squadron VC-8 embarked and screened by destroyer escorts USS Baker, Bronstein, Thomas, Breeman, Coffman, and Bostwick. TG 22.2 departed Norfolk bound for the Central Atlantic that same day.
20 Sep 1944 Hunter-Killer Task Group 22.2 centered around escort carrier USS Card and escorts arrived in Bermuda for four days of anti-submarine exercises that included drills with a friendly Italian submarine.
25 Sep 1944 Hunter-Killer Task Group 22.2 centered around escort carrier USS Card and escorts departed Bermuda for their patrol area in the mid-Atlantic for anti-submarine warfare. After being underway for barely 90 minutes, escort ship USS Breeman experienced an explosion and fire in her Number 4 engine that forced her return to Bermuda for repairs.
25 Oct 1944 After 30 days hunting for submarines in the mid-Atlantic without success, Task Group 22.2 centered around escort carrier USS Card arrived at Casablanca, French Morocco for two days' rest and replenishment.
26 Oct 1944 Escort carrier USS Card and her task group departed Casablanca and resumed their mid-Atlantic patrol.
2 Nov 1944 East of Bermuda, escort carrier USS Card took heavy seas over the fantail that flooded several compartments and injured one sailor. Flooding was pumped out with no damage to the ship.
4 Nov 1944 Escort carrier USS Card detached her escorts to proceed to New York and disembarked Composite Squadron VC-8 to fly to Norfolk Naval Air Station. Card arrived at Norfolk Naval Operating base, Norfolk, Virginia.
30 Nov 1944 Anti-submarine Hunter-Killer Task Group 22.2 (TG 22.2) centered around escort carrier USS Card with the TBM Avengers and FM-2 Wildcats of Composite Squadron VC-12 embarked and screened by destroyer escorts USS Baker, Bronstein, Thomas, Breeman, Coffman, and Bostwick was reformed at Norfolk, Virginia. TG 22.2 departed for the Central Atlantic that same day.
2 Dec 1944 Escort carrier USS Card and her task group arrived at Bermuda for four weeks of ant-submarine exercises and drills with a friendly submarine.
29 Dec 1944 Escort carrier USS Card and her task group departed Bermuda bound for New York.
31 Dec 1944 Escort carrier USS Card arrived at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, Brooklyn, New York.
4 Jan 1945 Escort carrier USS Card departed Brooklyn Navy Yard bound for Quonset Point, Rhode Island.
5 Jan 1945 Escort carrier USS Card arrived at Quonset Point, Rhode Island for two weeks of carrier landing qualifications. Composite Squadron VC-12 was disembarked to Quonset Point Naval Air Station.
21 Jan 1945 Escort carrier USS Card departed Quonset Point, Rhode Island bound for the Philadelphia Navy Yard, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
22 Jan 1945 Escort carrier USS Card arrived at the Philadelphia Navy Yard for an extensive overhaul.
4 Feb 1945 Escort carrier USS Card departed Philadelphia bound for New York.
5 Feb 1945 Escort carrier USS Card arrived at New York.
11 Feb 1945 Loaded with 47 US Army P-47 Thunderbolts and 175 US Army and Navy personnel as passengers, escort carrier USS Card and the similarly loaded USS Bogue departed New York as part of Convoy CU-58 bound for Liverpool, England, United Kingdom.
22 Feb 1945 Escort carriers USS Card and Bogue arrived at Liverpool, England, United Kingdom.
26 Feb 1945 Escort carrier USS Card, with 74 passengers embarked, was prepared to depart Liverpool for New York but had to remain in port due to high winds.
1 Mar 1945 Escort carrier USS Card, still in port at Liverpool due to high winds, was struck by the converted liner RMS Empress of Scotland as the troopship was changing berths. Card’s LSO platform and net were damaged.
2 Mar 1945 Escort carriers USS Card and Bogue departed Liverpool bound for New York.
3 Mar 1945 Escort carrier USS Card joined with the main section of Convoy UC-58(B) which had departed from Southampton, England.
11 Mar 1945 While at sea, escort carriers USS Card and Bogue detached from Convoy UC-58(B) and change course to Norfolk, Virginia.
12 Mar 1945 Escort carriers USS Card and Bogue arrived at Norfolk, Virginia.
14 Mar 1945 At Norfolk, Captain Paul L. Dudley relieved Captain Rufus Young as commanding officer of escort carrier USS Card.
20 Mar 1945 Escort carrier USS Card departed Norfolk bound for Quonset Point, Rhode Island.
21 Mar 1945 Escort carrier USS Card arrived at Quonset Point, Rhode Island where she would spend the next 9 weeks conducting carrier landing qualifications in Narragansett Bay involving 4,742 aircraft landings with only one fatal mishap
25 May 1945 Escort carrier USS Card departed Narragansett Bay bound for Norfolk, Virginia and a maintenance period.
26 May 1945 Escort carrier USS Card arrived at Norfolk, Virginia for nearly four weeks of maintenance and upkeep.
21 Jun 1945 Loaded with 25 TD2C-1 utility aircraft of Utility Squadron VJ-5 and all of the squadron’s peripheral equipment plus 127 passengers, escort carrier USS Card departed Norfolk, Virginia bound for Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
24 Jun 1945 Escort carrier USS Card arrived at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and began unloading all equipment and disembarking all passengers.
25 Jun 1945 Escort carrier USS Card, with no cargo, passengers or air group embarked, departed Guantanamo Bay, Cuba bound for the Panama Canal.
27 Jun 1945 Escort carrier USS Card arrived at Cristóbal, Panama Canal Zone whereupon the was detached from the Atlantic Fleet and reported for duty to the Pacific Fleet.
14 Aug 1945 Escort carrier USS Card arrived at San Diego, California from Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
7 Jan 1946 Escort carrier USS Card departed Alameda, California bound for Norfolk, Virginia.
13 May 1946 Escort carrier USS Card was placed out of commission at Norfolk, Virginia and transferred to the reserve fleet.
16 May 1958 Escort carrier Card was reactivated as an aircraft transport as part of the Military Sea Transportation Service as USNS Card operating with a civilian crew.
15 Dec 1961 Aircraft transport USNS Card departed Quonset Point, Rhode Island with a load of H-21 Shawnee helicopters and US Army soldiers bound for Vietnam.
2 May 1964 While aircraft transport USNS Card was at Saigon, Vietnam (now Ho Chi Minh City), a Viet Cong swimmer named Lam Son Nao placed an explosive charge against the hull that blew a hole in the ship and killed five crewmen. Card settled in 20 feet of water.
19 May 1964 Seventeen days following aircraft transport USNS Card being sunk in 20 feet of water at Saigon, Vietnam, the ship was raised after being patched and pumped out.
11 Dec 1964 Aircraft transport USNS Card returned to service at Yokosuka, Japan after being damaged at Saigon Harbor seven months earlier.
10 Mar 1970 Aircraft transport USNS Card was taken out of service and entered the reserve fleet once more at Olympia, Washington.
14 May 1971 The former escort carrier Card was sold for scrapping to the Zidell Corporation for $93,900.00.

Photographs

Todd-Pacific Shipyard, Tacoma, Washington, United States in 1942-43. 21 of the 37 Bogue-class escort carriers built at Todd-Pacific are seen in this photo and 5 more are just out of frame to the left.Todd-Pacific Shipyard, Tacoma, Washington, United States in 1942-43. 26 of the 37 Bogue-class escort carriers built at Todd-Pacific are seen in this photo.
See all 29 photographs of Escort Carrier Card (CVE-11)



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Escort Carrier Card (CVE-11) Photo Gallery
Todd-Pacific Shipyard, Tacoma, Washington, United States in 1942-43. 21 of the 37 Bogue-class escort carriers built at Todd-Pacific are seen in this photo and 5 more are just out of frame to the left.Todd-Pacific Shipyard, Tacoma, Washington, United States in 1942-43. 26 of the 37 Bogue-class escort carriers built at Todd-Pacific are seen in this photo.
See all 29 photographs of Escort Carrier Card (CVE-11)


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