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3 Jul 1836

Germany
  • Heloglander Rickmer Classen Rickmers laid down the keel of its first vessel, a 23-ton barge, in Bremerhaven, Germany. ww2dbase [Rickmers | Bremerhaven, Weser-Ems | AG]
8 Nov 1843

Germany
18 May 1856

Germany
  • Heloglander Rickmer Classen Rickmers signed a contract for a site 65,000 square meters in size at Geesthelle, Bremerhaven, Germany to expand operations. ww2dbase [Rickmers | Bremerhaven, Weser-Ems | AG]
1 Jul 1872

Germany
  • Heloglander Rickmer Classen Rickmers acquired the rice distribution company Bremer Rice and changed its name to Ichon & Rickmers. ww2dbase [Rickmers | Bremerhaven, Weser-Ems | AG]
27 Nov 1886

Germany
  • Rickmer Clasen Rickmers, the founder of Heloglander Rickmer Classen Rickmers, passed away. His 79-year-old son Andreas Rickmers took control of the company. ww2dbase [Rickmers | Bremerhaven, Weser-Ems | AG]
15 Jan 1902

Germany
  • The shipbuilding supplier firm Norddeutschen Maschinen- und Armaturenfabrik GmbH was founded in Bremen, Germany. ww2dbase [Atlas Werke AG | Bremen, Weser-Ems | AG]
30 Oct 1911

Germany
  • The Bremen, Germany-based firm Norddeutschen Maschinen- und Armaturenfabrik GmbH was transformed into the shipbuilder Atlas Werke AG. ww2dbase [Atlas Werke AG | Bremen, Weser-Ems | AG]
5 Oct 1925

Germany
15 Jul 1926

Germany
16 Aug 1928

Photo(s) dated 16 Aug 1928
Launching ceremony of SS Bremen, Deschimag shipyard, Bremen, Germany, 16 Aug 1928
1 Oct 1928

Germany
5 Jan 1929

Germany
  • Major worker strikes ended at Atlas Werke AG in Bremen, Germany; nevertheless, several contracts were lost to foreign competitors. ww2dbase [Atlas Werke AG | Bremen, Weser-Ems | AG]
23 Jul 1929

Germany
25 Jun 1931

Germany
1 Apr 1933

Germany
12 Nov 1934

Germany
11 Nov 1935

Germany
  • The keel of U-27 was laid down by AG Weser in Bremen, Germany. ww2dbase [U-27 | Bremen, Weser-Ems | CPC]
20 Apr 1936

Germany
11 May 1936

Germany
24 Jun 1936

Germany
7 Oct 1936

Germany
12 Nov 1936

Germany
1 Jul 1937

Germany
2 Aug 1937

Germany
9 Nov 1938

Germany
19 Jan 1939

Photo(s) dated 19 Jan 1939
Launching ceremony of Seydlitz, Deschimag shipyard, Bremen, Germany, 19 Jan 1939
1 Jul 1939

Germany Photo(s) dated 1 Jul 1939
Lützow being prepared for launch, Deschimag shipyard, Bremen, Germany, 1 Jul 1939
19 Aug 1939

Germany
  • U-40 departed Wilhelmshaven, Germany for her first war patrol. She was to patrol waters off of Gibraltar. ww2dbase [U-40 | Wilhelmshaven, Weser-Ems | CPC]
23 Aug 1939

Germany
4 Sep 1939

Germany
  • Emden was damaged during a British air raid at Wilhelmshaven, Germany when a damaged Blenheim aircraft crashed into the foreship, killing 9 and wounding 20. The aircraft's pilot was Flying Officer H. L. Emden, whose name matched that of the ship he had crashed into by pure chance. The RAF officer was later buried at the Sage War Cemetery in Großenkneten, northwestern Germany. ww2dbase [Emden | Wilhelmshaven, Weser-Ems | CPC]
18 Sep 1939

Germany
21 Sep 1939

Germany
10 Oct 1939

Germany
  • U-40 departed Wilhelmshaven, Germany for her second war patrol. She was to patrol waters off of Portugal and Spain. ww2dbase [U-40 | Wilhelmshaven, Weser-Ems | CPC]
2 Dec 1939

Germany
3 Jan 1940

Germany
5 Apr 1940

Germany
8 Apr 1940

Germany
10 Aug 1940

Germany
10 Mar 1941

Germany
  • The 5,972-ton German steam merchant Widar was mined in the Ems Estuary near the Island of Borkum off the German coast. ww2dbase [Weser-Ems | HM]
10 Apr 1941

Germany
28 Apr 1941

Germany
6 Jun 1941

Germany
15 Sep 1941

Germany
10 Jan 1942

Germany
1 May 1942

Germany
8 May 1942

Photo(s) dated 8 May 1942
Aerial view of Seydlitz, Z34, Z32, and Z33 in the Westhafen basin of Deschimag shipyard, Bremen, Germany, 8 May 1942
3 Jun 1942

Germany
6 Jun 1942

Germany
  • 233 British bombers (124 Wellington, 40 Stirling, 27 Halifax, 20 Lancaster, 15 Hampden, 7 Manchester) attacked Emden, Germany, destroying 300 houses, killing 17 civilians, and wounding 49; 9 bombers were lost on this mission. ww2dbase [Bombing of Hamburg, Dresden, and Other Cities | Emden, Weser-Ems | CPC]
20 Jun 1942

Germany
22 Jun 1942

Germany
  • 227 British RAF aircraft (144 Wellington, 38 Stirling, 26 Halifax, 11 Lancaster, and 8 Hampden) attacked Emden, Germany, destroying 50 houses, damaging harbor facilities, and killing 6 civilians (further 40 were injured); 6 bombers were lost on this mission. ww2dbase [Bombing of Hamburg, Dresden, and Other Cities | Emden, Weser-Ems | CPC]
25 Jun 1942

Germany
  • Sir Arthur Harris of the RAF Bomber Command launched the third Thousand Bomber Raid, this time sending 1,067 aircraft (including some aircraft from Coastal Command and Army Cooperation Command) to attack Bremen, Germany; only 696 reported successfully reaching the city. The RAF Bomber Command lost 48 aircraft, half of which had inexperienced crews recruited from training squadrons flying worn out aircraft; the RAF Coastal Command lost 5 aircraft. 572 houses were destroyed, 6,108 were damaged. 85 were killed, while 497 were wounded and 2,378 were made homeless. An assembly shop at the Focke-Wulf factory was destroyed, while the Bremer Vulkan shipyard and nearby docks and warehouses were also damaged. ww2dbase [Bombing of Hamburg, Dresden, and Other Cities | Bremer Vulkan AG | Bremen, Weser-Ems | AC, CPC]
27 Jun 1942

Germany
29 Jun 1942

Germany
2 Jul 1942

Germany
  • 325 British bombers (175 Wellington, 53 Lancaster, 35 Halifax, 34 Stirling, and 28 Hampden) attacked Bremen, Germany, damaging 1,000 houses and 4 small industrial facilities, damaging 3 cranes in the port area, damaging 7 ships, and sinking transport ship Marieborg. The Germans suffered 5 deaths and 4 wounded while the British lost 13 bombers. ww2dbase [Bombing of Hamburg, Dresden, and Other Cities | Bremen, Weser-Ems | CPC]
4 Jul 1942

Germany
8 Jul 1942

Germany
  • 285 British bombers (137 Wellington, 52 Lancaster, 38 Halifax, 34 Stirling, 24 Hampden) attacked the docks at Wilhelmshaven, Germany, causing little or no damage to the docks, killing 25 civilians, and wounding 170; 5 bombers were lost on this mission. ww2dbase [Bombing of Hamburg, Dresden, and Other Cities | Wilhelmshaven, Weser-Ems | CPC]
  • Wing Commander (Acting) Guy Gibson, at 23 the youngest Squadron commanding officer in RAF Bomber Command and a man already marked out for great things, flew the newly issued Lancaster bomber operationally for the first time during the raid on Wilhelmshaven, Germany. A young Australian pilot officer, Dave Shannon, went with him to gain experience. Shannon, like Gibson, was later to find fame in 617 Squadron. The aircraft they flew was lost a month later over Essen, Germany with a different crew. ww2dbase [Wilhelmshaven, Weser-Ems | AC]
19 Jul 1942

Germany
1 Aug 1942

Germany
9 Aug 1942

Germany
17 Aug 1942

Germany
4 Sep 1942

Germany
13 Sep 1942

Germany
14 Sep 1942

Germany
2 Oct 1942

Germany
25 Nov 1942

Germany
26 Feb 1943

Germany
18 Mar 1943

Germany
15 May 1943

Germany
11 Jun 1943

Germany
13 Jul 1943

Germany
  • In Bremen, Germany, Atlas Werke AG held its final General Meeting. Shortly after, Krupp would take over Atlas's operations and would rename the company Maschinenbau Kiel GmbH. ww2dbase [Atlas Werke AG | Bremen, Weser-Ems | AG]
1 Sep 1943

Germany
22 Sep 1943

Germany
20 Jan 1944

Germany
3 Feb 1944

Germany
20 Feb 1944

Germany
6 Mar 1944

Germany
7 Mar 1944

Germany
  • The 7,378-ton German cargo ship Vigo, now employed by the German Navy as the Sperrbrecher X, a mine barrage breaker, sailing in front of convoys to trigger off potential mines. She struck a mine for this purpose and sank 24 miles off Norderney on the German coast. ww2dbase [Weser-Ems | HM]
15 Mar 1944

Germany
  • Robert Johnson was promoted to the rank of captain. On the same day, he shot down a Fw 190 and a Bf 109 aircraft over Dümmer Lake, Germany. ww2dbase [Robert Johnson | Lembruch, Weser-Ems | CPC]
6 Jul 1944

Germany
24 Jul 1944

Germany
29 Jul 1944

Germany
7 Oct 1944

Germany
  • Major Richard Conner of USAAF 78th Fighter Group, flying a P-47 fighter, shot down a Me 262 jet aircraft over Osnabrück, Germany; the German pilot was observed to have bailed out before the jet crashed. ww2dbase [Osnabrück, Weser-Ems | CPC]
  • 1st Lieutenant Urban Drew, flying a P-51 fighter, shot down two Me 262 fighters (flown by Oberfeldwebel Heinz Arnold and Leutnant Gerhard Kobert) as they were taking off from Achmer Airfield. The only witness to the town victories, his wingman 2nd Lieutenant Robert McCandliss, was shot down by anti-aircraft fire and captured before the end of the mission, so Drew did not receive credit for these two downings until after the war when McCandliss was released from captivity. This was the first and only time in the war a pilot scored two jet victories in one mission. ww2dbase [Bramsche, Weser-Ems | CPC]
20 Oct 1944

Germany
  • A Heinkel III (5K+BT) flown by German Air Force pilot Unteroffizier Albert Fleichmann failed to return to base; later it was found that the aircraft had come down at Cloppenburg near Oldenbrg, Germany with the loss of all the crew. ww2dbase [Cloppenburg, Weser-Ems | HM]
6 Nov 1944

Germany
  • Captain Charles Yeager of USAAF 357th Fighter Group shot down a German Me 262 fighter while it was landing at Achmer Airfield in Germany; the German pilot, Oberfeldwebel Freutzer, survived the crash caused by the wing being shot off by Yeager. ww2dbase [Charles Yeager | Bramsche, Weser-Ems | CPC]
7 Nov 1944

Germany
  • Adolf Galland inspected the newly created Jagdgeschwader 7 wing at Achmer Airfield in Germany, which was equipped with Me 262 jet fighters. He repeated his orders for Walter Nowotny to keep a cover of Fw 190 fighters above the airfield when the jet fighters were taking off or landing, in order to prevent the situation that took place on the previous day. ww2dbase [Adolf Galland | Bramsche, Weser-Ems | CPC]
8 Nov 1944

Germany
  • German Luftwaffe ace Major Walter Nowotny claimed his 258th victory as he shot down a B-24 Liberator bomber over Hesepe near Osnabrück, Germany. Moments later, his Me 262 jet fighter was hit by a US P-51 fighter, possibly the one piloted by 1st Lieutenant Richard Stevens. Nowotny's final words were reported to be "my god, I'm burning!" His subsequent crash and explosion was witnessed by his commanding officer Adolf Galland and other officers, who immediately rushed to the crash site; they failed to find Nowotny's remains, only able to locate broken pieces of the pilot's Knight's Cross medal. ww2dbase [Hesepe, Weser-Ems | AC, CPC]
  • Adolf Galland monitored the progress of the operation "Big Blow" from the radio shack at Achmer Airfield, Germany. ww2dbase [Adolf Galland | Bramsche, Weser-Ems | CPC]
22 Nov 1944

Germany
  • A Heinkel bomber of 1 Staffel, flying a V-1 flying bomb mission, crashed at Osterode near Bramsche, Germany; the pilot Fähnrich Wilhelm Wolfshol and his observer Unteroffizier Georg Grill were killed, the other three crew members were badly injured. ww2dbase [V-Weapons Campaign | Osterode, Weser-Ems | HM]
15 Dec 1944

Germany
30 Dec 1944

Germany
31 Dec 1944

Germany
1 Jan 1945

Germany
22 Jan 1945

Germany
4 Feb 1945

Germany
  • About 3,000 men evacuated from Stalag Luft III in Sagan, Germany arrived at Marlag und Milag Nord prisoners of war camp in Westertimke, Germany. In order to accommodate them the entire population of Marlag's M Camp were moved into the O Camp. ww2dbase [Marlag und Milag Nord | Westertimke, Weser-Ems | HM]
7 Feb 1945

Germany
15 Feb 1945

Germany
22 Feb 1945

Germany
24 Feb 1945

Germany
25 Feb 1945

Germany
3 Mar 1945

Germany
7 Mar 1945

Germany
9 Mar 1945

Germany
11 Mar 1945

Germany
30 Mar 1945

Germany
  • US Eighth Air Force B-24 Liberator bombers attacked Wilhelmshaven, Germany, sinking the already-damaged cruiser Köln on even keel. Her turrets remained above water and operational. ww2dbase [Köln | Wilhelmshaven, Weser-Ems | HM]
  • Fleet tender Königin Louise was sunk by USAAF B-24 bombers at Wilhelmshaven, Germany. ww2dbase [F6 | Wilhelmshaven, Weser-Ems | CPC]
2 Apr 1945

Germany
  • The commandant of Marlag und Milag Nord prisoners of war camp in Westertimke, Germany announced that he had received orders to leave the camp with most of the regular camp guards. In the afternoon, a detachment of over a hundred SS-Feldgendarmerie, who were outside the commandant's command, entered the camp, mustered over 3,000 men, and marched them out eastwards. ww2dbase [Marlag und Milag Nord | Westertimke, Weser-Ems | HM]
3 Apr 1945

Germany
  • The column of prisoners of war that SS-Feldgendarmerie personnel forced out of Marlag und Milag Nord prisoners of war camp in Westertimke, Germany on the previous day were strafed by RAF aircraft at about 1000 hours. Several prisoners were killed. ww2dbase [Marlag und Milag Nord | Weser-Ems | HM]
9 Apr 1945

Germany
  • The guards of Marlag und Milag Nord prisoners of war camp in Westertimke, Germany departed. They were replaced by older men, presumably local Volkssturm personnel. ww2dbase [Marlag und Milag Nord | Westertimke, Weser-Ems | HM]
19 Apr 1945

Germany
  • British Second Army attacked Bremen, Germany across the Elbe River while Canadian troops captured the Luftwaffe base of Stade, 40 kilometers west of Hamburg, without opposition. ww2dbase [Bremen, Weser-Ems | TH]
  • Units of German 15th Panzergrenadier Division positioned tanks and artillery next to Marlag und Milag Nord prisoners of war camp in Westertimke, Germany. The remaining prisoners of the camp responded to the threat of a battle by digging slit trenches. ww2dbase [Marlag und Milag Nord | Westertimke, Weser-Ems | HM]
27 Apr 1945

Germany
15 May 1946

Germany
  • Horst Wessel was commissioned into the US Coast Guard in Bremerhaven, Germany under the new name Eagle, with Captain Gordon McGowan in command. ww2dbase [Horst Wessel | Bremerhaven, Weser-Ems | CPC]
3 Apr 2017

Germany

Timeline Section Founder: Thomas Houlihan
Contributors: Alan Chanter, C. Peter Chen, Thomas Houlihan, Hugh Martyr, David Stubblebine
Special Thanks: Rory Curtis




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Thomas Dodd, late 1945


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