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T10

CountryGermany
Ship Class1935-class Motor Torpedo Boat
BuilderF. Schichau Elbing
Yard Number1394
Ordered29 Jun 1936
Laid Down24 Nov 1936
Launched19 Jan 1939
Commissioned5 Aug 1940
Sunk19 Dec 1944
Displacement873 tons standard; 1,126 tons full
Length277 feet
Beam28 feet
Draft9 feet
MachineryFour water-tube boilers, two geared steam turbines, two shafts
Power Output31,000 shaft horsepower
Speed35 knots
Range1,200nm at 19 knots
Crew119
Armament1x10.5cm SK C/32 gun, 1x3.7cm SK C/30 anti-aircraft gun, 2x2cm C/30 anti-aircraft guns, 2x3x533mm torpedo tubes, 30-60 mines
Decommission15 Aug 1941
Recommssion13 May 1942

Contributor:

ww2dbaseGerman Navy torpedo boat T10 was commissioned into service in Aug 1940. In Sep 1940, she began escorting duties in the Baltic Sea. In Nov 1940, she and her sister torpedo boats were sent to intercept an Allied convoy originating in Norway sailing toward Kinnaird Head, Scotland, United Kingdom, but the operation was aborted after the German boats entered a British minefield that Germany had not previously detected; torpedo boat T6 struck a mine and was lost. Between Mar and Jul 1941, she underwent a refit at Kiel, Germany. She was decommissioned and placed in reserve in Aug 1941. She was recommissioned in May 1942. In Jul 1942, she was transferred to France, where she was attached to the 3rd Torpedo Boat Flotilla, with which unit she laid mines and performed escort duties. In Oct 1942, she was badly damaged during an attempt to escort auxiliary cruiser Komet out to the Atlantic Ocean; she was struck by six shells from a British force of five destroyers and eight torpedo boats, one of which detonated one of T10's own depth charges, killing 11 and wounding 11. Komet was sunk in the English Channel near the tip of the Cotentin Peninsula. She returned to Germany in Dec 1942 and was decommissioned for repairs. In May 1943, she was recommissioned. She briefly served with the Torpedo School as a training boat before becoming the senior officer's boat of the 25th Submarine Flotilla in Jul 1943. In Sep 1943, she was again assigned to the Torpedo School. Between Feb and Apr 1944, she underwent a refit, upon which completion she was assigned to the 2nd Torpedo Boat Flotilla, operating in the Baltic Sea. She participated in the failed attempt to capture Narvi (Nerva) Island in the Gulf of Finland in Jun 1944. On 28 Nov 1944, she was damaged by a Soviet air raid on Liep─üja, Latvia (German: Libau), and then again by a near-miss on 15 Dec. She was at Gotenhafen, Germany (now Gdynia, Poland) for repairs when the port city was attacked by British bombers on 18 Dec 1944. While in drydock, she sustained fatal damage in her hull, leading to her sinking early in the morning of 19 Dec 1944. No attempts to refloat her inside the drydock were made by the Germans.

ww2dbaseSource: Wikipedia

Motor Torpedo Boat T10 Interactive Map

T10 Operational Timeline

29 Jun 1936 The keel of torpedo boat T10 was laid down at the F. Schichau yard in Elbing, Germany (now Elblag, Poland).
24 Nov 1936 The order for the construction of torpedo boat T10 was issued.
19 Jan 1939 T10 as launched at the F. Schichau yard in Elbing, Germany (now Elblag, Poland).
5 Aug 1940 T10 was commissioned into service.
6 Nov 1940 German 1st and 2nd Torpedo Boat Flotillas (torpedo boats T1, T4, T6, T7, T8, T9, and T10) departed Trondheim, Norway to intercept an Allied convoy sailing toward Kinnaird Head, Scotland, United Kingdom.
7 Nov 1940 German 1st and 2nd Torpedo Boat Flotillas (torpedo boats T1, T4, T6, T7, T8, T9, and T10), while sailing to intercept an Allied convoy sailing toward Kinnaird Head, Scotland, United Kingdom, entered a British minefield 40 miles north of the convoy. T6 struck a mine shortly after midnight at the beginning of this day and sank; the survivors were picked up by T7 and T8. The operation was canceled and the two flotillas returned to base.
15 Aug 1941 T10 was decommissioned from service and placed in reserve.
13 May 1942 T10 was recommissioned into service.
20 Jul 1942 German 3rd Torpedo Boat Flotilla (T4, T10, T13, and T14) laid two minefields in the English Channel.
1 Aug 1942 German 3rd Torpedo Boat Flotilla (T10, T13, and T14) laid a minefields in the English Channel after sundown and into the next date.
8 Aug 1942 German 3rd Torpedo Boat Flotilla (T10, T13, and T14) began escorting oiler Ermland in an attempt to break out into the Atlantic Ocean.
9 Aug 1942 An message was sent out to Morisini at 2300 hours, informing her that a German ship Uckermark, escorted by torpedo boats T10, T13, and T14, might come across her path in the Atlantic Ocean. She did not respond to this message.
10 Aug 1942 An message was sent out to Morisini informing her that she was to make rendezvous with German ship Uckermark, escorted by torpedo boats T10, T13, and T14 in the Atlantic Ocean at 1000 hours. At 1000, Morisini failed to appear. Three German aircraft in flight in the area searched for her, but failed.
11 Aug 1942 German oiler Ermland successfully broke out into the Atlantic Ocean via the Bay of Biscay, arriving at Royan, France; she was escorted by torpedo boats T10, T13, and T14 of German 3rd Torpedo Boat Flotilla.
15 Aug 1942 Uckermarck and Ermland departed Royan, France, escorted by torpedo boats T4 and T10, in an attempt to pass through the English Channel for coast of the Bay of Biscay.
16 Aug 1942 Uckermarck and Ermland arrived at La Pallice, La Rochelle, France; they were escorted by torpedo boats T4 and T10.
13 Oct 1942 German auxiliary cruiser Komet departed Le Havre, France, escorted by German 3rd Torpedo Boat Flotilla (T4, T10, T14, and T19), attempting to break out into the Atlantic Ocean.
14 Oct 1942 A British force consisted of five destroyers and eight torpedo boats intercepted a German attempt to break auxiliary cruiser Komet into the Atlantic Ocean via the English Channel. Komet was sunk northeast of Cherbourg, France; all aboard were killed in the sinking. Of the German escorts (torpedo boats T4, T10, T14, and T19), T10 was damaged after being hit by six shells, one of which detonating a depth charge; 11 were killed and 11 were wounded.
10 Aug 1943 T10 was made the senior officer's ship of the German 25th Submarine Flotilla.
19 Jun 1944 German torpedo boats T8, T10, T30, and T31, carrying Finnish forces, sailed towards Narvi (Nerva) Island in the Gulf of Finland. En route, they engaged a Soviet force consisted of four gunboats, 10 submarine chasers, and 14 torpedo boats. The Germans opened fire first, damaging gunboat MBK-503, gunboat MBK-505, and submarine chaser MO-106. The Soviet torpedo boats counter attacked without success, and TK-53, TK-63, and TK-153 sustained damage. Yet another attack by Soviet torpedo boats failed, with TK-101 and TK-103 sustaining damage. A third attack by Soviet torpedo boats TK-37 and TK-60 successfully hit and sank German torpedo boat T31; 76 were killed, 6 survivors were picked up by the Soviet ships, and 23 survivors were picked up by Finnish ships. The German force turned back and abandoned to operation at Narvi after midnight on the next date. German torpedo boat T30 also sustained damage in this engagement.
28 Nov 1944 T10 was damaged by a Soviet air raid on Liep─üja, Latvia (Libau).
15 Dec 1944 T10 was damaged by a near-miss.
18 Dec 1944 British bombers raided Gdynia, Poland (Gotenhafen), fatally damaging German torpedo boat T10.
19 Dec 1944 T10 sank at Gdynia, Poland (Gotenhafen) as the result of a British raid on the previous day.




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