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Type 11 AA file photo [13209]

Type 11 75 mm Anti-Aircraft Gun

Country of OriginJapan
TypeAnti-Aircraft Gun
Caliber75.000 mm
Barrel Length2,562.000 mm
Weight2061.000 kg
Ammunition Weight6.50 kg
Ceiling6,650 m
Muzzle Velocity525 m/s

Contributor:

ww2dbaseThe Japanese Type 11 75-millimeter anti-aircraft guns were designed in 1920 and placed into production in 1922. They were the first dedicated anti-aircraft guns in Japanese service. They were mounted on five-legged platforms, with each of the legs being adjustable to keep the mounts steady, and had an effective range of 6,650 meters and maximum range of 10,900 meters. Considered too expensive to build, only 44 were produced before production was terminated. They first saw combat in 1931 in Manchuria in northeastern China, and saw action in China Proper after 1937 and in Russia during the brief border war in the late 1930s.

Source: Wikipedia

ww2dbase

Last Major Revision: Aug 2011

Photographs

Japanese Type 11 anti-aircraft gun, date unknown




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Japanese Type 11 anti-aircraft gun, date unknown


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