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Ba 349 Natter rocket interceptor being prepared for launch, circa early 1945; seen in bulletin 'Guided Missiles-The Weapon of the Future' published by US War Department in Apr 1946

Caption   Ba 349 Natter rocket interceptor being prepared for launch, circa early 1945; seen in bulletin 'Guided Missiles-The Weapon of the Future' published by US War Department in Apr 1946 ww2dbase
Source    ww2dbaseUnited States War Department
More on...   
Ba 349 Natter   Main article  Photos  
Added By C. Peter Chen
Added Date 25 May 2008
Licensing  Public Domain



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Visitor Submitted Comments

1. Commenter identity confirmed BILL says:
19 Mar 2009 06:22:28 PM

28,February 1945 the Bachmen Natter is prepared for its first piloted vertical launch. The Natter was little more than a piloted surface to air missile. The pilot Lothar Siebert, was killed in the first test.
2. Commenter identity confirmed Bill says:
17 Nov 2009 12:04:16 PM

Lother Siebert was the first and only pilot of a vertical launch, in a rocket powered craft in 1945. It wasn't until 1961, that Yuri Gagarin was launched aboard the Soviet Vostok 1, to become the first man into space.
3. Commenter identity confirmed Bill says:
17 Nov 2009 01:25:48 PM

Oberleutnant Lother Siebert's launch at first went well,but one of the jettisonable rocket boosters failed to release, and the Natter got out of control. At 1,600ft. the cockpit canopy pulled off as Sieber intended to bail out, but as he went into the clouds, he could have hit the canopy and injuried himself,the Natter rolled over and nose-dived into the ground killing Sieber. It is suspected that Sieber may have broken the sound barrier on the way down. Excavations of the crash site in 1998, found remains of the rocket-booster. Near the end of the war,the Germans did have a battery of (ten) Natters on alert ready for launch, but no Allied bombers flew within range. The U.S. 7th Army overran the area, but not before the Germans blew up all (ten) of the Natters and their launchers. 36 Natters were built 18 Were used in unmanned tests. 2 Crashed with pilots,one during glide test the other during manned launch with Sieber 10 Were destroyed by the Germans. 6 Were captured by the Allies. Erich Bachem (1906-1960) After the war he returned to designing and building camping trailers. Went into business with Eriwn Hymer today in Europe, Hymer is synonymous with recreational vehicles.
4. Commenter identity confirmed Bill says:
11 Nov 2014 02:58:29 PM

PILOT REMEMBERED: Did you know that the New West German Luftwaffe honored pilot Lother Sieber who was killed during the first manned vertical test launch of the bi-fueled liquid rocket Natter, February 28, 1945 pilot Sieber experienced during launch 2.2 times the force of gravity.
5. Commenter identity confirmed Bill says:
11 Nov 2014 04:08:27 PM

Did you know the first prototype to make a manned unpowered test flight of the Ba 349 was by pilot Zubert it was towed to altitude in December 1944 other tests followed with no problems all were unpowered. First manned powered test flight of the Ba 349 was March 1,1945 that crashed killing the pilot Lother Sieber. NO WOODEN WONDER: The Ba 349 was constructed from wood with plywood skin. The nose section was built from metal that held the 24 R4M rockets. After the attack, the aft section was ejected with rocket motor and returned by parachute to be used again. The solid fuel boosters for launch on each side of the fuselage, had enough thrust for twelve seconds of burn and were ejected. The rocket motor HWK 109-509A2 had eighty seconds of power, producing 3,750lbs of thrust.

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