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Japanese Navy pilot Lieutenant Zenji Abe posing in front of a A6M2 Zero fighter aboard Akagi, late 1941-early 1942

Caption   Japanese Navy pilot Lieutenant Zenji Abe posing in front of a A6M2 Zero fighter aboard Akagi, late 1941-early 1942 ww2dbase
More on...   
A6M Zero   Main article  Photos  
Akagi   Main article  Photos  
Added By C. Peter Chen
Added Date 11 May 2013

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Visitor Submitted Comments

1. Commenter identity confirmed Bill says:
15 May 2013 05:49:21 PM

SURVIVOR: Photograph shows Lt.Zenji Abe standing in front of a Mitsubishi A6M2 Zero, not an Aichi Type 99 Dive Bomber as caption states. Abe flew AI-210 Aichi, Type 99 D3A1 Dive Bomber with, Po Chiaki Saito (Radioman/Gunner) The Zero was designed with retractable landing gear, as shown in the photo, where the Val Dive Bomber had fixed spatted landing gear. During the Pearl Harbor Attack one D3A was lost in the 1st wave, and fourteen in the 2nd wave with the loss of thirty crew KIA. Flew in China in training missions, and saw no enemy action. During the Pacific War, Lt.Abe took part in the Pearl Harbor attack, Dutch Harbor in the Aleutians, Battles in the Indian Ocean, Australia. He also took part in other operations during the Pacific War and fought in the Battle of the Philippine Sea. LOST: AND ON HIS OWN During operations in 1944 Abe forced landed on a small island between Saipan and Guam. He was stranded there until wars end taken POW by US Forces and held for fifteen-months and later repatriated to japan.
2. Commenter identity confirmed C. Peter Chen says:
15 May 2013 08:52:48 PM

Thank you Bill, the caption has been corrected.
3. Commenter identity confirmed Bill says:
2 Jul 2016 06:06:45 PM

PEARL HARBOR MEAL: Pilots were waken early dressed and had a breakfast of red beans, with rice, tai and red snapper fish, vegetables, tea, water, fruit juice or condensed milk. Did you know that rice made up 50% of enlisted and officers diet, along with barley, fish, vegetables, meat, seaweed, crab meat and soups and stews along with rations of rice beer, bottled rice wine (sake) and cider even ice cream and other canned foods aboard ship. RESPECTS: After breakfast pilots and air crew stopped at the ships Shinto Shrine many felt they wouldn't return and said prayers and offerings. PILOTS MAN YOUR AIRCRAFT: Pilots and air crew assemble for last formation before manning their aircraft, and given last minute instructions. Pilots wore the Hachimaki head band, that denotes the warrior going into battle. OFF THE DECK: First launch was before daylight first aircraft off were A6M Zero/Zeke fighters, next the D3A Val Dive Bombers, followed by the B5N Kate Level and Torpedo Bombers. Target Pearl Harbor the world would never be the same. WWII changed the world forever the events that followed changed the lives of millions upon millions and are still being studied to this very day... Film of Interest: TORA, TORA, TORA (1970) available on DVD

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