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Tokarev TT-33 Handgun

Country of OriginRussia
TypeHandgun
Caliber7.620 mm
Capacity8 rounds
Length196.000 mm
Barrel Length116.000 mm
Weight0.830 kg
Muzzle Velocity420 m/s

Contributor:

ww2dbaseThe Samozarjadnyj Pistolet Tokareva obrazca 1930 goda, or Tokarev TT-30 pistols (along with the TT-33 variant pistols), were developed by Fedor Tokarev to replace the aging Nagant M1895 pistols. The first batch was produced in 1931 under the designation TT-30, while efforts to improve the original design were already under way to streamline production. As the improved design entered production, the new products were re-designated TT-33 pistols.

During WW2, TT-33 pistols were the standard side arm of Russian Army officers. They viewed these weapons favorably, commenting that they were rugged and reliable due to their relatively simple construction. That characteristic allowed the TT-33 pistols to take a great deal of abuse typical of battlefields conditions without malfunctioning.

As some of the Russian TT-33 pistols became captured by the Germans, many of them were put in use under the designation Pistole 615(r). One of reasons why the Germans readily used captured TT-33 pistols was because of ammunition availability, as the Germans were able to use the German 7.63-mm Mauser cartridges with these pistols due to their similarities with the Russian 7.62-mm Model 1930 Type P cartridges.

Production of the Tokarev TT-33 pistols ended in Russia in 1954 after 1.7 million examples were made, but licensed and illegal copies continued to be made elsewhere, including in China, North Korea, Poland, Hungary, Egypt, Yugoslavia, Pakistan and in other countries. Today, Norinco, the official weapons manufacturer of Communist China, still manufactures variants of the Tokarev TT-33 pistol.

Source: Wikipedia.

ww2dbase

Last Major Revision: Sep 2008

Photographs

Soviet lieutenant (possibly A. G. Yeremenko of 220th Rifle Regiment of Soviet 4th Rifle Division) waving a TT-33 pistol, Voroshilovgrad region, Ukraine, 12 Jul 1942Soviet and US officers near Elbe River, Germany, 28 Apr 1945; note left Soviet officer




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Visitor Submitted Comments

1. ali says:
13 May 2010 09:20:07 AM

i need purchas it
2. Commenter identity confirmed Bill says:
28 Sep 2012 06:55:55 PM

PLEASE CLICK ON FILE PHOTO, JR. OFFICER HOLDING HIS TOKAREV TT-33
3. Commenter identity confirmed Bill says:
29 Sep 2012 12:14:54 PM

PLEASE CLICK ON FILE PHOTO OF SOVIET AND AMERICAN OFFICERS FOR DETAIED INFO.
4. Renato says:
7 Sep 2016 08:44:47 PM

I had a Tokarev TT 33 when I Was living in Italy, one of the best handgun I never had, I'd like to find one here in California, shooting that gun was great!

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Tokarev TT-33 Handgun Photo Gallery
Soviet lieutenant (possibly A. G. Yeremenko of 220th Rifle Regiment of Soviet 4th Rifle Division) waving a TT-33 pistol, Voroshilovgrad region, Ukraine, 12 Jul 1942Soviet and US officers near Elbe River, Germany, 28 Apr 1945; note left Soviet officer


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