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Bremse file photo [29870]

Bremse

CountryGermany
BuilderKriegsmarinewerft
Laid Down22 Apr 1930
Launched14 Jun 1932
Commissioned7 Jul 1932
Sunk7 Sep 1941
Displacement1,870 tons standard
Length345 feet
Beam31 feet
Draft9 feet
MachineryMAN diesel engines, two shafts
Power Output28,400 SHP
Speed29 knots
Range3,000nm
Crew285
Armament4x12.7cm SK C/34 guns, 4x3.7cm SK C/30 anti-aircraft guns, 8x2cm FlaK 30 guns, 250 mines
Armor30mm belt, 25mm deck

Contributor:

ww2dbaseBremse was commissioned into service in 1932 as an artillery training ship with a secondary function as a test bed for new marine diesel engines. She was initially attached to the artillery training school at Kiel, Germany. Later in the year, she had her mast shortened to improve stability, and her artillery director was removed. Her first commanding officer was Fanger (Jul 1932-Mar 1933), followed by Liebetanz (Mar 1933-Sep 1934), Tobye (Sep 1934-Sep 1935), Matthies (Sep 1935-Sep 1936), Goetze (first term, Sep 1936-Nov 1937), Dominik (first term, Nov 1937-Jun 1938), Goetze (second term, Jun 1938-Oct 1938), Dominik (second term, Oct 1938). When the European War began in Sep 1939, she was under the command of Förschner (Oct 1938-Dec 1940). In the fall of 1939, she briefly escorted troop transports in the Baltic Sea before returning to Kiel to serve her previous role with training. In Apr 1940, during the Norwegian invasion, she was shelled by coastal artillery at Bergen and sustained two direct hits; she was later repaired at Stavanger, Norway further down the coast. In Dec 1940, Jacobs was named her commanding officer. In Jun 1941, she returned to Kiel, where Brosy-Steinberg was named her new commanding officer, and she was assigned to escort duties. On 6 Sep 1941, she was escorting troop transports Trautenfels and Barcelona in Hammerfjord in northern Norway when the convoy was discovered by the British. She successfully drew fire away from the troop transports, but British cruiser HMS Nigeria was able to ram the gunfire-damaged Bremse, sinking her in two pieces at 0130 hours. 160 were lost in her sinking.

ww2dbaseSource: Wikipedia

Last Major Revision: Sep 2020

Bremse Interactive Map

Bremse Operational Timeline

14 Jun 1932 Bremse was launched by Kriegsmarinewerft in Wilhelmshaven, Germany.
7 Jul 1932 Bremse was commissioned into service.
1 Nov 1940 Bremse was rammed by refrigerated cargo ship Donau off Bergen, Norway, causing some damage.
30 Jul 1941 Bremse was attacked by British Albacore torpedo bombers and Fulmar fighters of carrier HMS Victorious, but the aircraft caused no damage.
7 Sep 1941 British cruisers HMS Nigeria and HMS Aurora attacked a German convoy in Hammerfjord in northern Norway at 0130 hours, sinking German gunnery ship Bremse; HMS Nigeria was damaged in the bow and was sent back to Britain for repairs.

Photographs

Bremse off Laboe, Germany, 1936-1941; note Laboe Naval Memorial in background




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Bremse Photo Gallery
Bremse off Laboe, Germany, 1936-1941; note Laboe Naval Memorial in background


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