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Crashed B-17 prototype Model 299, 30 Oct 1935

Caption   Crashed B-17 prototype Model 299, 30 Oct 1935 ww2dbase
Source    ww2dbaseUnited States Air Force
More on...   
B-17 Flying Fortress   Main article  Photos  Maps  
Photos on Same Day See all photos dated 30 Oct 1935
Added By C. Peter Chen
Added Date 6 Apr 2007

This photograph has been scaled down; full resolution photograph is available here (1,800 by 1,135 pixels).

Licensing  Public Domain. According to the United States copyright law (United States Code, Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105), in part, "[c]opyright protection under this title is not available for any work of the United States Government".



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Visitor Submitted Comments

1. Commenter identity confirmed BILL says:
17 Mar 2009 10:05:27 AM

B-299 crashed on Oct. 30, 1935, when the Army test pilot took off with the flight controls locked. The pilot Major Ployer Hill at the controls. The B-299 had a new feature built into the design. Because of its size, it incorporated mechanical control locks that operated from the cockpit instead of the well-known external locks attached to the control surface while the aircraft was on the ground. Major Hill did not disengage the locks prior to takeoff. The B-299 got airborne, but the only control movement was in the servo tabs. Without the main surfaces moveing this complicated the problem. The B-299 crashed.
2. Mark Cerull says:
30 Oct 2019 10:28:12 AM

The beginning of this great USA machine would through great trial and effort go on to help in great way go on to bring the AXIS powers to it's knees. To all the brave men to crewed this aircraft in WW2 all I can say is God Bless you and our great country. The B-17 will as an aircraft will live as long or longer than any other weapon of war.

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