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As seen from of the USS Hancock, the USS Lexington and USS Yorktown (both Essex-class) are anchored close aboard at Ulithi, late Dec 1944. Note Hancock’s 20mm anti-aircraft guns lining the flight deck.

Caption   As seen from of the USS Hancock, the USS Lexington and USS Yorktown (both Essex-class) are anchored close aboard at Ulithi, late Dec 1944. Note Hancock’s 20mm anti-aircraft guns lining the flight deck. ww2dbase
Photographer   
Source    ww2dbaseUnited States Navy via NavSource
Identification Code   80-G-308602
More on...   
Yorktown (Essex-class)   Main article  Photos  
Hancock   Main article  Photos  
Lexington (Essex-class)   Main article  Photos  
20 mm Oerlikon   Main article  Photos  
Added By David Stubblebine
Added Date 1 Aug 2016

This photograph has been scaled down; full resolution photograph is available here (1,280 by 800 pixels).

Licensing  Public Domain. According to the United States copyright law (United States Code, Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105), in part, "[c]opyright protection under this title is not available for any work of the United States Government".



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Visitor Submitted Comments

1. Commenter identity confirmed David Stubblebine says:
25 Jan 2018 04:03:58 PM

Other sources list this photo as being taken from the USS Essex showing the USS Lexington (Essex-class) and another (unnamed) Essex-class carrier in Ulithi on 10 Feb 1945. I find this date unlikely to the point of being impossible. Clearly, the carrier seen predominantly at left is the Lexington since she was the only Essex-class carrier painted that way during that period. In checking the Ulithi berthing assignments, we find that Lexington was not berthed near the other carriers in Feb 1945 but she was on 24-30 Dec 1944. Also, in Dec 1944 the carrier berths were near the cruisers with smaller berths (destroyers) in between, as is seen in the image. So if this assessment is correct, this photo was taken from the Hancock in Berth 27 showing the Lexington in Berth 28, the Yorktown (Essex-class) beyond in Berth 29, the light cruiser USS Miami at far right in Berth 146, light cruiser Astoria to the left of Miami in Berth 145, light cruiser Vincennes in the distance to the left of Astoria in Berth 144, and unidentified escort ships in between.

Additionally, the Dec 1944 date makes better sense when we consider who took this photo. Before the war, Jerome Zerbe was a noted photographer of the rich and famous who joined the Navy after Pearl Harbor and became the photographer of Admirals, including becoming Nimitz’ personal photographer. In neither Dec 1944 nor Feb 1945 was Essex a flagship and would not likely have had Zerbe on board while Hancock was McCain’s flagship in Dec 1944 where Zerbe’s presence would have been far more likely.

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Modern Day Location
WW2-Era Place Name Ulithi, Caroline Islands
Lat/Long 10.0427, 139.6973
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