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US Navy officers on the bridge of the captured U-505, 14 Jun 1944, Cdr Earl Trosino, Capt Daniel Gallery, and Lt(jg) Albert David. The U-505 was captured by Capt Gallery’s hunter group built around the USS Guadalcanal

Caption   US Navy officers on the bridge of the captured U-505, 14 Jun 1944, Cdr Earl Trosino, Capt Daniel Gallery, and Lt(jg) Albert David. The U-505 was captured by Capt Gallery’s hunter group built around the USS Guadalcanal ww2dbase
Source    ww2dbaseUnited States Navy
Identification Code   NH105857
More on...   
The Capture of the U-505   Main article  Photos  
U-505   Main article  Photos  
Photos on Same Day See all photos dated 14 Jun 1944
Added By David Stubblebine
Added Date 25 Apr 2014

This photograph has been scaled down; full resolution photograph is available here (760 by 938 pixels).

Licensing  Public Domain. According to the United States copyright law (United States Code, Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105), in part, "[c]opyright protection under this title is not available for any work of the United States Government".



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Visitor Submitted Comments

1. Commenter identity confirmed David Stubblebine says:
25 Apr 2015 07:37:10 PM

Cdr Earl Trosino was the chief engineer of the USS Guadalcanal and commander of the boarding parties that effected the actual capture of the U-Boat. Capt Daniel V Gallery was captain of the USS Guadalcanal and commander of hunter-killer Task Group 22.3. Lt(jg) Albert L David was the assistant engineering officer on the USS Pillsbury, one of USS Guadalcanal’s escorts, and he led the initial boarding party that secured U-505. For his actions, Lt(jg) David was awarded the Medal of Honor. His citation reads: “For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while attached to the USS Pillsbury during the capture of an enemy German submarine off French West Africa, June 4, 1944. Taking a vigorous part in the skillfully coordinated attack on the U-505 at the end of a prolonged search by the Task Group, Lt. (then Lt. j.g.) David boldly led a party from the Pillsbury in boarding the hostile submarine as it circled erratically at 5 or 6 knots on the surface. Fully aware that the U-boat might at any moment sink or be blown up by exploding demolition and scuttling charges, he braved the added danger of enemy gunfire to plunge through the conning tower hatch and, with his small party, exerted every effort to keep the ship afloat and to assist the succeeding and more fully equipped salvage parties in making the U-505 seaworthy for the long tow across the Atlantic to a U.S. port. By his valiant service during the first successful boarding and capture of an enemy man-of-war on the high seas by the United States Navy since 1815, Lt. David contributed materially to the effectiveness of the Battle of the Atlantic and upheld the highest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service.”

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WW2-Era Place Name Atlantic Ocean
Lat/Long 26.5000, -46.6833
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