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US President Dwight Eisenhower with Medal of Honor recipients Edward Schowalter, Jr., Ernest West, and William Charette, White House, Washington DC, United States, 12 Jan 1954

Caption   US President Dwight Eisenhower with Medal of Honor recipients Edward Schowalter, Jr., Ernest West, and William Charette, White House, Washington DC, United States, 12 Jan 1954 ww2dbase
Source    ww2dbaseUnited States Navy Naval History and Heritage Command
Identification Code   NH 68545
More on...   
White House   Main article  Photos  
Dwight Eisenhower   Main article  Photos  
Added By C. Peter Chen
Added Date 26 Dec 2012

This photograph has been scaled down; full resolution photograph is available here (740 by 584 pixels).

Licensing  Public Domain. According to the US Navy Naval History and Heritage Command, as of 21 Jul 2010:
Official government photographs and documents are in the public domain and may be scanned and reproduced in print or online. They may be cropped or resized, but their content may not be altered.
Additionally, according to the United States copyright law (United States Code, Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105), in part, "[c]opyright protection under this title is not available for any work of the United States Government".



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Visitor Submitted Comments

1. Commenter identity confirmed David Stubblebine says:
20 Sep 2012 10:35:37 PM

William R. Charette’s Medal of Honor citation, for actions in Korea, reads: On March 27, 1953, during a Chinese attack on Marine outpost Vegas, Charette faced a growing number of casualties exposed to hostile small-arms and mortar fire. When a grenade landed near him, he threw himself over his patient, absorbing the blast with his own body. In another instance, he removed his battle vest and placed it on a patient. In addition, he tore parts of his uniform to dress battle wounds and later stood up in a trench, exposing himself to incoming rounds, to aid a wounded comrade. He sustained many painful wounds during the battle.
2. Commenter identity confirmed David Stubblebine says:
20 Sep 2012 10:36:15 PM

Ernest E. West’s Medal of Honor citation, for actions performed 12 Oct 1952 near Sataeri, Korea, reads: Pfc. West distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy. He voluntarily accompanied a contingent to locate and destroy a reported enemy outpost. Nearing the objective, the patrol was ambushed and suffered numerous casualties. Observing his wounded leader lying in an exposed position, Pfc. West ordered the troops to withdraw, then braved intense fire to reach and assist him. While attempting evacuation, he was attacked by 3 hostile soldiers employing grenades and small-arms fire. Quickly shifting his body to shelter the officer, he killed the assailants with his rifle, then carried the helpless man to safety. He was critically wounded and lost an eye in this action, but courageously returned through withering fire and bursting shells to assist the wounded. While evacuating 2 comrades, he closed with and killed 3 more of the foe. Pfc. West's indomitable spirit, consummate valor, and intrepid actions inspired all who observed him, reflect the highest credit on himself, and uphold the honored traditions of the military service.
3. Commenter identity confirmed David Stubblebine says:
20 Sep 2012 10:36:49 PM

Edward Schowalter’s Medal of Honor citation, for actions performed 14 Oct 1952 near Kumhwa, Korea, reads: 1st Lt. Schowalter, commanding, Company A, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and indomitable courage above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy. Committed to attack and occupy a key-approach to the primary objective, the 1st Platoon of his company came under heavy vicious small-arms, grenade, and mortar fire within 50 yards of the enemy-held strongpoint, halting the advance and inflicting several casualties. The 2d Platoon moved up in support at this juncture, and although wounded, 1st Lt. Schowalter continued to spearhead the assault. Nearing the objective he was severely wounded by a grenade fragment but, refusing medical aid, he led his men into the trenches and began routing the enemy from the bunkers with grenades. Suddenly from a burst of fire from a hidden cove off the trench he was again wounded. Although suffering from his wounds, he refused to relinquish command and continued issuing orders and encouraging his men until the commanding ground was secured and then he was evacuated. 1st Lt. Schowalter’s unflinching courage, extraordinary heroism, and inspirational leadership reflect the highest credit upon himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

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Modern Day Location
WW2-Era Place Name Washington, United States
Lat/Long 38.8977, -77.0366
Famous WW2 Quote
"Goddam it, you'll never get the Purple Heart hiding in a foxhole! Follow me!"

Captain Henry P. Jim Crowe, Guadalcanal, 13 Jan 1943