×
Home Intro People Events Equipment Places Maps Books Photos Videos Other Reference FAQ About
     

World War II Database

Bomb Damage Assessment photo of destroyed Ki-48 bombers at a Japanese airstrip in northern New Guinea, 1942-1943, photo 2 of 2; note open parachutes in upper center (bombs or supplies?)

Caption   Bomb Damage Assessment photo of destroyed Ki-48 bombers at a Japanese airstrip in northern New Guinea, 1942-1943, photo 2 of 2; note open parachutes in upper center (bombs or supplies?) ww2dbase
Source    ww2dbaseUnited States Army Air Forces
More on...   
Ki-48 Sokei   Main article  Photos  
New Guinea-Papua Campaign, Phase 2   Main article  Photos  
Added By David Stubblebine
Added Date 18 Jan 2011

This photograph has been scaled down; full resolution photograph is available here (1,406 by 1,708 pixels).

Licensing  Public Domain. According to the United States copyright law (United States Code, Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105), in part, "[c]opyright protection under this title is not available for any work of the United States Government".



Did you enjoy this photograph? Please consider supporting us on Patreon. Even $1 per month will go a long way! Thank you.

Share this photograph with your friends:

 Facebook
 Reddit
 Twitter

Stay updated with WW2DB:

 RSS Feeds


Visitor Submitted Comments

1. Commenter identity confirmed Bill says:
1 Apr 2011 09:39:49 PM

"Parafrag bombs" were 23lb/10kg fragmentation cluster/bombs attached by parachute dropped over the target. The Douglas A-20 Havoc could carry 40 of these weapons and would attack at low altitude over a Japanese airfield or other targets such as runways, troops or other positions, the parachutes would slow the bombs so the attacking aircraft would be out of the blast radius. The parafrag was widely used by the Fifth Air force in (SWPA) South West Pacific Area. In three attacks alone over Japanese airfields over 150 aircraft were destroyed along with pilots, aircrew plus 300 ground crew strafing runs on the fields with fifty-caliber machine guns, destroying equipment, fuel and personnel, the A-20 lived up to its name of Havoc. Straf from the German word strafen, to punish.
2. F. Pelder says:
5 Jan 2018 05:14:32 AM

These are not parafrag bombs in my opinion. Those chutes are much smaller. If you zoom in you can see a lot of men walking around so I think this is supplies being dropped.

All visitor submitted comments are opinions of those making the submissions and do not reflect views of WW2DB.

Posting Your Comments on this Topic

Your Name
Your Email
 Your email will not be published
Comment Type
Your Comments
Security Code
 

 

Note: We hope that visitor conversations at WW2DB will be constructive and thought-provoking. Please refrain from using strong language. HTML tags are not allowed. Your IP address will be tracked even if you remain anonymous. WW2DB site administrators reserve the right to moderate, censor, and/or remove any comment. All comment submissions will become the property of WW2DB.

Change View
Desktop View

Search WW2DB & Partner Sites
Famous WW2 Quote
"The raising of that flag on Suribachi means a Marine Corps for the next 500 years."

James Forrestal, Secretary of the Navy, 23 Feb 1945