×
Home Intro People Events Equipment Places Maps Books Photos Videos Other Reference FAQ About
     

World War II Database


7.5 cm Feldkanone 38 Field Gun

Country of OriginGermany
TypeField Gun
Caliber75.000 mm
Barrel Length2,550.000 mm
Weight1366.000 kg
Ammunition Weight5.85 kg
Rate of Fire8 rounds/min
Range11,500 m
Muzzle Velocity605 m/s

Contributor:

ww2dbaseThe 7.5 cm Feldkanone (FK) 38 were designed by the German armament firm Krupp and they were adopted by the German Army in 1939. 80 guns were produced for the German Army, and 64 were built for export to the Brazilian Army. They were longer than the earlier 7.5 cm FK 18 field guns for a better range, but instead of replacing, 7.5 cm FK 38 guns served alongside of 7.5 cm FK 18 guns.

Source: Wikipedia

ww2dbase

Last Major Revision: Dec 2010




Did you enjoy this article? Please consider supporting us on Patreon. Even $1 per month will go a long way! Thank you.

Share this article with your friends:

 Facebook
 Reddit
 Twitter

Stay updated with WW2DB:

 RSS Feeds


Visitor Submitted Comments

1. Luiz says:
23 Oct 2015 03:08:35 PM

What is the length of the round? And the shell case?

All visitor submitted comments are opinions of those making the submissions and do not reflect views of WW2DB.

Posting Your Comments on this Topic

Your Name
Your Email
 Your email will not be published
Comment Type
Your Comments
Security Code
 

 

Note: We hope that visitor conversations at WW2DB will be constructive and thought-provoking. Please refrain from using strong language. HTML tags are not allowed. Your IP address will be tracked even if you remain anonymous. WW2DB site administrators reserve the right to moderate, censor, and/or remove any comment. All comment submissions will become the property of WW2DB.

Change View
Desktop View

Search WW2DB & Partner Sites
Famous WW2 Quote
"You ask, what is our aim? I can answer in one word. It is victory. Victory at all costs. Victory in spite of all terrors. Victory, however long and hard the road may be, for without victory there is no survival."

Winston Churchill