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23 items in this album on 2 pages.

The chandelier style gondola of a Japanese Fu-Go balloon bomb recovered in the Klamath Mountains between Red Bluff and Hayfork, California, United States 1 Feb 1945. Note the clear battery box on top.Nearly deflated Japanese Fu-Go Type A balloon grounded near Tremonton, Utah, United States, 23 Feb 1945. The ballast dropping equipment found with this balloon was damaged.
The chandelier style gondola of a Japanese Fu-Go balloon bomb recovered in the Klamath Mountains between Red Bluff and Hayfork, California, United States 1 Feb 1945. Note the clear battery box on top.Nearly deflated Japanese Fu-Go Type A balloon grounded near Tremonton, Utah, United States, 23 Feb 1945. The ballast dropping equipment found with this balloon was damaged.
A Royal Canadian Navy intelligence officer approaching a downed Japanese Fu-Go balloon bomb in the western Canadian provinces, circa Mar 1945. Note the incendiary bombs still attached.Captain Harold Cross of the Canadian Army was a balloon expert and is seen here next to a Japanese Fu-Go balloon’s ballast dropping apparatus after a balloon bomb recovery in Canada.
A Royal Canadian Navy intelligence officer approaching a downed Japanese Fu-Go balloon bomb in the western Canadian provinces, circa Mar 1945. Note the incendiary bombs still attached.Captain Harold Cross of the Canadian Army was a balloon expert and is seen here next to a Japanese Fu-Go balloon’s ballast dropping apparatus after a balloon bomb recovery in Canada.
United States Army photo of a partially deflated Japanese Fu-Go balloon bomb over the Pacific Ocean, likely near the Aleutian Islands. This shows why these descending balloons were often mistaken for parachutes.Japanese Fu-Go balloon bomb draped across power lines in Toppenish, Washington, United States, 10 Mar 1945. This balloon caused a power outage that briefly affected the Hanford nuclear reactors 40 miles away.
United States Army photo of a partially deflated Japanese Fu-Go balloon bomb over the Pacific Ocean, likely near the Aleutian Islands. This shows why these descending balloons were often mistaken for parachutes.Japanese Fu-Go balloon bomb draped across power lines in Toppenish, Washington, United States, 10 Mar 1945. This balloon caused a power outage that briefly affected the Hanford nuclear reactors 40 miles away.
A captured and partially reinflated Japanese Fu-Go Type A balloon bomb inside the blimp hangar at Naval Air Station Moffett Field, Mountain View, California, United States, Aug 1945.A captured and reinflated Japanese Fu-Go paper Type A balloon being evaluated at Naval Air Station Moffett Field, Mountain View, California, United States, Aug 1945.
A captured and partially reinflated Japanese Fu-Go Type A balloon bomb inside the blimp hangar at Naval Air Station Moffett Field, Mountain View, California, United States, Aug 1945.A captured and reinflated Japanese Fu-Go paper Type A balloon being evaluated at Naval Air Station Moffett Field, Mountain View, California, United States, Aug 1945.
A captured and reinflated Japanese Fu-Go Type A balloon bomb on a tethered test flight at Naval Air Station Moffett Field, Mountain View, California, United States, Aug 1945.A captured and reinflated Japanese Type B Fu-Go rubberized silk balloon, Aug 1945. Probably inside the blimp hangar at Naval Air Station Moffett Field, Mountain View, California, United States.
A captured and reinflated Japanese Fu-Go Type A balloon bomb on a tethered test flight at Naval Air Station Moffett Field, Mountain View, California, United States, Aug 1945.A captured and reinflated Japanese Type B Fu-Go rubberized silk balloon, Aug 1945. Probably inside the blimp hangar at Naval Air Station Moffett Field, Mountain View, California, United States.
A recovered ballast dropping apparatus from a Japanese Fu-Go balloon bomb that has been reassembled for demonstration purposes.A stripped-down view of the chandelier style frame of the ballast dropping apparatus from a captured Japanese Fu-Go balloon bomb.
A recovered ballast dropping apparatus from a Japanese Fu-Go balloon bomb that has been reassembled for demonstration purposes.A stripped-down view of the chandelier style frame of the ballast dropping apparatus from a captured Japanese Fu-Go balloon bomb.
Annotated photo of the payload components of a Japanese Fu-Go balloon bomb, circa Aug 1945.A captured Japanese paper Fu-Go Type A balloon bomb, reinflated for testing, being wheeled out of the blimp hangar at Naval Air Station Moffett Field, Mountain View, California, United States, 27 Aug 1945.
Annotated photo of the payload components of a Japanese Fu-Go balloon bomb, circa Aug 1945.A captured Japanese paper Fu-Go Type A balloon bomb, reinflated for testing, being wheeled out of the blimp hangar at Naval Air Station Moffett Field, Mountain View, California, United States, 27 Aug 1945.
A recovered ballast dropping apparatus from a Japanese Fu-Go balloon bomb being examined by an American technician. He is removing the battery case to expose the components of the barometer box beneath.Close up of a Japanese 5kg Type A incendiary bomb hanging from a ballast ring of a Fu-Go balloon bomb, mid-1945. Note the two blowout plugs in the ballast ring supporting this bomb.
A recovered ballast dropping apparatus from a Japanese Fu-Go balloon bomb being examined by an American technician. He is removing the battery case to expose the components of the barometer box beneath.Close up of a Japanese 5kg Type A incendiary bomb hanging from a ballast ring of a Fu-Go balloon bomb, mid-1945. Note the two blowout plugs in the ballast ring supporting this bomb.
Men of the United States Army 1st Cavalry Division examining the freshly discovered launch site for the Fu-Go balloon bombs at Otsu, Japan Apr 1947. The dark barrel-shaped devices are gas generators for the hydrogen gas.Annotated diagram of a Japanese Fu-Go Type A balloon bomb from top to bottom.
Men of the United States Army 1st Cavalry Division examining the freshly discovered launch site for the Fu-Go balloon bombs at Otsu, Japan Apr 1947. The dark barrel-shaped devices are gas generators for the hydrogen gas.Annotated diagram of a Japanese Fu-Go Type A balloon bomb from top to bottom.
Annotated diagram of a Japanese Fu-Go Type A balloon bomb from top to bottom.Postwar American chart roughly showing the path of the jet-stream used by the Japanese Fu-Go balloon bombs. The actual path curved sharply northward along the Aleutians and down the North American coast.
Annotated diagram of a Japanese Fu-Go Type A balloon bomb from top to bottom.Postwar American chart roughly showing the path of the jet-stream used by the Japanese Fu-Go balloon bombs. The actual path curved sharply northward along the Aleutians and down the North American coast.

23 items in this album on 2 pages.

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