×
Home Intro People Events Equipment Places Maps Books Photos Videos Other Reference FAQ About
     

World War II Database

Cutaway diagram of the Mark XIV torpedo, 1940s.Aerial view of Goat Island in Narragansett Bay and within the City of Newport, Rhode Island, United States which became home to the United States Navy’s Bureau of Ordnance Naval Torpedo Factory in 1869.
Cutaway diagram of the Mark XIV torpedo, 1940s.Aerial view of Goat Island in Narragansett Bay and within the City of Newport, Rhode Island, United States which became home to the United States Navy’s Bureau of Ordnance Naval Torpedo Factory in 1869.
United States Navy photograph showing the size comparison between the Mark XIV submarine torpedo (top) and the Mark XIII aerial torpedo.Seven United States Navy officers and one Chief Petty Officer pose with the station’s first Mark XIV torpedo at the Naval Torpedo Station at Keyport, Washington, United States, 1943.
United States Navy photograph showing the size comparison between the Mark XIV submarine torpedo (top) and the Mark XIII aerial torpedo.Seven United States Navy officers and one Chief Petty Officer pose with the station’s first Mark XIV torpedo at the Naval Torpedo Station at Keyport, Washington, United States, 1943.
United States Navy Mark XIV submarine torpedo balanced in Shop 41 at the Naval Torpedo Station, Alexandria, Virginia, 1944.Letter from Albert Einstein to the United States Navy’s Bureau of Ordnance describing the forces experienced by a torpedo’s firing pin mechanism upon impact with a solid object, 4 Jan 1944, page 1 of 2.
United States Navy Mark XIV submarine torpedo balanced in Shop 41 at the Naval Torpedo Station, Alexandria, Virginia, 1944.Letter from Albert Einstein to the United States Navy’s Bureau of Ordnance describing the forces experienced by a torpedo’s firing pin mechanism upon impact with a solid object, 4 Jan 1944, page 1 of 2.
Letter from Albert Einstein to the United States Navy’s Bureau of Ordnance describing the forces experienced by a torpedo’s firing pin mechanism upon impact with a solid object, 4 Jan 1944, page 2 of 2.Department heads at the United States Navy’s Naval Torpedo Station, Alexandria, Virginia posing with the last Mark XIV torpedo produced at the facility, Aug 1945.
Letter from Albert Einstein to the United States Navy’s Bureau of Ordnance describing the forces experienced by a torpedo’s firing pin mechanism upon impact with a solid object, 4 Jan 1944, page 2 of 2.Department heads at the United States Navy’s Naval Torpedo Station, Alexandria, Virginia posing with the last Mark XIV torpedo produced at the facility, Aug 1945.
United States Navy Mark XIV torpedo on display at the War in the Pacific National Historical Park, Asan Beach, Guam, Mariana Islands. 2011 photo.
United States Navy Mark XIV torpedo on display at the War in the Pacific National Historical Park, Asan Beach, Guam, Mariana Islands. 2011 photo.
Further Reading

Read more about Mark XIV



Change View
Desktop View

Search WW2DB & Partner Sites
News

Famous WW2 Quote
"An appeaser is one who feeds a crocodile, hoping it will eat him last."

Winston Churchill


Support Us

Please consider supporting us on Patreon. Even $1 a month will go a long way. Thank you!

Or, please support us by purchasing some WW2DB merchandise at TeeSpring, Thank you!